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1297 posts
  • Higher Education
  • University of California
Sujit Choudhry
Sujit Choudhry (Associated Press)

UC Berkeley is under fire again over the issue of sexual misconduct.

The university announced last week that University of California regents had reached a legal settlement with Sujit Choudhry, a former law school dean who admitted in a campus investigation that he inappropriately kissed, touched and hugged his former assistant, Tyann Sorrell. Under the settlement, UC agreed to drop a disciplinary action against Choudhry, withdraw all charges and allow him to remain a tenured faculty member until his voluntary resignation “in good standing” at the end of the next academic year. Until then, UC agreed to provide him up to $10,000 for travel each school year and $97,210 in research funds.

Choudhry agreed to pay $50,000 to a charity of Sorrell’s choosing and $50,000 to her attorneys.

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(Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles

It's been one week since the deadly shooting at San Bernardino's North Park Elementary. Now it's back to school.

Are vaccination rates as high as we think? In Los Angeles County, 200 private schools didn't report their data.

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  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
California Secretary of State Alex Padilla
California Secretary of State Alex Padilla (John Myers / Los Angeles Times)

Teens, it's time to get ready to vote. 

California's Secretary of State Alex Padilla recently announced that most 16- and 17-year-olds now can pre-register to vote. When they turn 18, their registration will automatically activate.

Who is qualified? Citizens who are California residents, not imprisoned for a felony and not prohibited from voting by a court because of mental incompetency.

(Alex Wong / Getty Images)

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos this week announced a key hire in civil rights enforcement: attorney Candice E. Jackson, who will serve as deputy assistant secretary in the Education Department's Office for Civil Rights.

Until DeVos picks someone to lead the Office for Civil Rights — and that person is confirmed by the Senate — Jackson is in charge of an office that the Obama administration used to protect transgender students, investigate and punish universities that mishandled sexual assault cases, and to make sure students with disabilities had their needs met. 

The nonprofit investigative newsroom ProPublica reviewed Jackson's limited track record and writings and found that, as a calculus student at Stanford University in the 1990s, Jackson wrote that she felt she had been excluded because she was white. She also wrote an op-ed for a conservative publication at Stanford about her objections to affirmative action. 

  • K-12
  • HS Insider

“Who got Addy?”

These are the words Roger, a West High athlete, heard minutes before he went out to compete. He recalls how one of his teammates just “popped it open and distributed it to everyone.”

Roger doesn’t have attention disorders, and neither do most of his teammates. Wesley, the teammate providing the Adderall, first acquired a prescription in fifth grade. Wesley only takes the 20-milligram pill when he needs to study or compete in the sport, although the prescription states he is supposed to take it daily. He provides it to his teammates for free.

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The San Bernardino Police Department has released a harrowing 911 tape of the frantic moments after a gunman entered a special education classroom this week, killing a teacher and an 8-year-old boy and wounding a second boy before the gunman killed himself.

The San Bernardino Police Department on Friday released two harrowing 911 tapes of the frantic moments after a gunman entered a special education classroom this week, killing a teacher and an 8-year-old boy and wounding a second boy.

The audio tapes from Monday’s shooting featured a frightened staffer at North Park Elementary School in San Bernardino and a dispatcher who relayed a description of the gunman to officers arriving at the scene.

Nutritionist Gabrielle Guzman tells a mom that her daughter, who is 60 pounds overweight, is heading down a path toward diabetes.
Nutritionist Gabrielle Guzman tells a mom that her daughter, who is 60 pounds overweight, is heading down a path toward diabetes. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

For years, health experts have bemoaned the rise of childhood obesity in the United States. About 17% of children and teens in the U.S. are now considered obese, a figure that has more than tripled since the 1970s, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

report in this week’s edition of the New England Journal of Medicine lays out one of the consequences of all this excess weight: a corresponding increase in childhood cases of type 2 diabetes.

  • K-12
Map shows approximate location of Northwood High School in Irvine.
Map shows approximate location of Northwood High School in Irvine. (Los Angeles Times)

A threat at Northwood High School in Irvine triggered a lockdown Thursday afternoon, school officials said.

The Irvine Police Department said it received a call about 1:40 p.m. from a man threatening violence on the campus. Officers immediately responded to the school and were working with the school’s staff “to ensure the safety of the students,” police said.

Police later reported that officers found “no suspicious activity."

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  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
A parent holds up a letter detailing concerns about anti-union efforts at Alliance Gertz-Ressler Academy High School in Los Angeles.
A parent holds up a letter detailing concerns about anti-union efforts at Alliance Gertz-Ressler Academy High School in Los Angeles. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

A state audit released Thursday of Alliance College-Ready Public Schools has cleared the charter school network of any financial wrongdoing in relation to its efforts to fight unionization.

Alliance operates 28 middle and high school charters in Los Angeles. Charter schools are publicly funded, but privately managed. Alliance teachers, as in most charters, are not represented by a union.

But two years ago, 67 Alliance teachers began advocating to join United Teachers Los Angeles, a move that the charter network fiercely opposed.

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
King/Drew Magnet High School of Medicine and Science
King/Drew Magnet High School of Medicine and Science (Los Angeles Unified School District)

A private effort to reshape public education in Los Angeles took its next step Thursday with the announcement that two public schools would receive $750,000 grants to re-create themselves in other locations.

Public Service Community School and King/Drew Magnet High School of Medicine and Science, both located south of downtown L.A., got the money from Great Public Schools Now, a nonprofit group that says it wants to replicate successful schools of any kind.

Although the group is closely associated with efforts to expand the number of charter schools in L.A., it has made a point of also sharing funding under its control with programs of the Los Angeles Unified School District.