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1256 posts
  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos visit St. Andrew Catholic School in Orlando, Fla.
President Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos visit St. Andrew Catholic School in Orlando, Fla. (Joe Burbank / TNS)

The Trump administration wants to spend $1.4 billion to expand vouchers, including for private schools, and would pay for it with deep cuts to federal aid to public schools, according to budget documents released Thursday. 

Voucher programs, a favorite cause of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, provide tax funds to families that they can use to pay for tuition at private or religious schools.

The $1.4 billion in the budget for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1 would be the down payment on a program that would be "ramping up to an annual total of $20 billion," the budget says.

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Amid rising public concern about college expenses, University of California regents were told Wednesday that the cost of attending UC campuses increased by about $1,100, or 4% last year.

The public university system’s new cost survey found that food, housing and healthcare costs rose, but transportation and book expenses dropped. The survey, conducted last spring at every campus, will be used to set budgets for 2017-18.

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(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

When they unveiled the California School Dashboard on Wednesday, state education officials described it as the most comprehensive way yet to assess the state of California public schools.

Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson heralded the website as “a resource unlike anything we’ve ever had before” and “a high-tech report card for our schools.”

But the new color-coded system grades on a curve and paints a far rosier picture in academics than past measurements, a Times analysis found.

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
UC President Janet Napolitano
UC President Janet Napolitano (Astrid Riecken / Getty Images)

University of California regents will tackle a host of hot-button issues at their two-day meeting in San Francisco beginning Wednesday, including proposed enrollment limits on students from other states and countries, the rising cost of attendance and the campus housing squeeze.

Regents also will vote to approve the appointment of Carol T. ChristUC Berkeley’s top academic officer who would be the 11th chancellor and first woman to lead the 149-year-old campus.

Board members also will discuss a proposed policy to impose sanctions against regents found to have violated university rules on ethics and sexual misconduct, even outside their university roles.

  • K-12
  • For Parents
(Christine Cotter / Los Angeles Times)

The state's California School Dashboard just came online, a website years in the making. 

It replaces the Academic Performance Index as the state's official tool for rating schools. 

You should be able to access the portal here, though the site seems to be having some problems right now.

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
UC regents, led by system President Janet Napolitano, second from left, meet in February in Los Angeles.
UC regents, led by system President Janet Napolitano, second from left, meet in February in Los Angeles. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

University of California regents will tackle a host of hot-button issues at their two-day meeting in San Francisco beginning Wednesday, including proposed enrollment limits on students from other states and countries, the rising cost of attendance and the campus housing squeeze.

Regents also will vote to approve the appointment of Carol T. Christ as UC Berkeley’s 11th chancellor and the first woman to lead the 149-year-old campus.

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
David Cortese, president of Santa Clara County's Board of Supervisors, discusses litigation to block President Trump's executive order affecting "sanctuary cities."
David Cortese, president of Santa Clara County's Board of Supervisors, discusses litigation to block President Trump's executive order affecting "sanctuary cities." (Santa Clara County)

The Los Angeles Board of Education on Tuesday unanimously authorized its legal staff to participate in a lawsuit challenging the authority of the Trump administration to withhold federal funds from "sanctuary cities."

The suit, filed by Santa Clara County, is one of several to challenge a Jan. 25 executive order declaring that sanctuary cities "have caused immeasurable harm to the American people and to the very fabric of our republic."

The lawsuit calls the executive order an "unprecedented" and unconstitutional attempt to expand executive power.

Raphael Bostic was named president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
Raphael Bostic was named president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. (Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta)

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Parents at many local schools don't want to share their campuses with charters — and in typical L.A. fashion, some are hoping that a little star power will strengthen their case. 

Actor Ioan Gruffudd, whose daughter attends Third Street Elementary School in Hancock Park, told the Los Angeles Unified School District board on Tuesday what his child and others would lose if they have to give up some classrooms under a law that requires school districts to share available facilities with charter schools.

"The rooms you have designated as empty are actually not empty, but used for ... music and drama, the very things that got me where I am today," Gruffudd told the board. 

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
Outgoing L.A. Unified Chief Financial Officer Megan Reilly
Outgoing L.A. Unified Chief Financial Officer Megan Reilly (Los Angeles Unified)

Two departing officials of the Los Angeles Unified School District made the most of their swan songs Tuesday. 

Chief Financial Officer Megan Reilly warned of a financial precipice if the nation's second-largest school district failed to trim spending. Outgoing board member Monica Ratliff blasted the city utility over its bills to the district, then castigated district staff for not yet solving a problem at a local elementary school.

Reilly is stepping down after a decade to accept a similar job with the Santa Clara County Office of Education.