Advertisement

UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks improperly accepted free university benefits, including membership to the campus fitness center, two years of personal training sessions and the unauthorized transfer of exercise equipment from the public gym to his private residence, a university investigation has found.

Overall, Dirks failed to pay for $4,990 in fees for the gym membership and personal training and enjoyed the private use of a Precor Cross Trainer elliptical exercise machine worth between $3,500 and $4,000, according to findings of the heavily redacted report released Friday.

UC ethics rules bar employees from the unauthorized use of campus resources or facilities or the “entanglement” of private interests with UC obligations. The investigation, performed for the UC Office of the President by an outside firm, Public Interest Investigations Inc., concluded that Dirks violated those rules and concluded that the allegations against him by an unnamed whistleblower were founded.

Advertisement

UC Berkeley Chancellor Nicholas Dirks improperly accepted free university benefits, including membership to the campus fitness center, two years of personal training sessions and the unauthorized transfer of exercise equipment from the public gym to his private residence, a university investigation has found.

Overall, Dirks failed to pay for $4,990 in fees for the gym membership and personal training and enjoyed the private use of a Precor Cross Trainer elliptical exercise machine worth between $3,500 and $4,000, according to findings of the heavily redacted report released Friday.

UC ethics rules bar employees from the unauthorized use of campus resources or facilities or the “entanglement” of private interests with UC obligations. The investigation, performed for the UC Office of the President by an outside firm, Public Interest Investigations Inc., concluded that Dirks violated those rules and concluded that the allegations against him by an unnamed whistleblower were founded.

Advertisement
  • Higher Education
Wounded students from the American University of Afghanistan receive treatment at a hospital in Kabul.
Wounded students from the American University of Afghanistan receive treatment at a hospital in Kabul. (Wakil Kohsar / AFP/Getty Images)

Seven months after an insurgent attack shattered their oasis in one of the world’s most turbulent capitals, students are expected to return to classes Saturday at a more heavily secured American University of Afghanistan.

While the main campus that was attacked won’t reopen until summer, a smaller compound less than a mile away plans to welcome students with concrete T-walls for blast protection, bulletproof gates and steel safe doors, along with fresh desks, white boards and carpets.

  • K-12
(Anadolu Agency / Getty Images)

Canada's largest school board no longer will book any trips to the U.S. because of fears students might have trouble at the border because of travel restrictions enacted by President Trump.

The Toronto District School Board cited the uncertainty of the new travel restrictions Wednesday. Director of Education John Malloy said students should not be put in situations of potentially being turned away at the border. He said the board remains committed to fairness, equity and inclusion.

  • K-12
(Anadolu Agency / Getty Images)

Canada's largest school board no longer will book any trips to the U.S. because of fears students might have trouble at the border because of travel restrictions enacted by President Trump.

The Toronto District School Board cited the uncertainty of the new travel restrictions Wednesday. Director of Education John Malloy said students should not be put in situations of potentially being turned away at the border. He said the board remains committed to fairness, equity and inclusion.

Advertisement
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles TImes)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

(AP Photo / Jeff Chiu)

UC Berkeley is under fire again for its handling of sexual misconduct allegations.

A new lawsuit alleges that university officials failed to properly respond to complaints that John Searle, an 84-year-old renowned philosophy professor, sexually assaulted his 24-year-old research associate last July and cut her pay when she rejected his advances, according to BuzzFeed News. The researcher, Joanna Ong, was then fired by a Searle associate in September, the lawsuit alleges. 

Last year, UC Berkeley was rocked by complaints that Chancellor Nicholas Dirks had failed to properly discipline three prominent faculty members found to have violated university rules against sexual misconduct. The furor contributed to the loss of campus confidence in Dirks, who subsequently announced his resignation.

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
UC President Janet Napolitano
UC President Janet Napolitano (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

University of California President Janet Napolitano is headed to Mexico next week to reassure leaders there that the public research university remains committed to academic collaboration — even if some of it, such as climate change research, is at risk under the Trump administration.

In an interview Wednesday, Napolitano said she would build on the UC-Mexico Initiative she launched in 2014 despite President Trump’s plans to build a border wall, increase immigration enforcement and reduce federal research funding.

Advertisement
  • Higher Education
Olga Perez Stable Cox
Olga Perez Stable Cox (File photo | Daily Pilot)

The Orange Coast College professor who made controversial comments about now-President Trump in a video recorded by a student during class last fall has declined to accept OCC's Faculty of the Year award, according to the college.

Human-sexuality professor Olga Perez Stable Cox was notified of the award last week, but she declined to accept and did not want to participate in related activities, said Doug Bennett, executive director of the Orange Coast College Foundation.

  • Higher Education
Olga Perez Stable Cox
Olga Perez Stable Cox (File photo | Daily Pilot)

The Orange Coast College professor who made controversial comments about now-President Trump in a video recorded by a student during class last fall has declined to accept OCC's Faculty of the Year award, according to the college.

Human-sexuality professor Olga Perez Stable Cox was notified of the award last week, but she declined to accept and did not want to participate in related activities, said Doug Bennett, executive director of the Orange Coast College Foundation.