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UC President Janet Napolitano
UC President Janet Napolitano (Astrid Riecken / Getty Images)

The University of California sued the Trump administration Friday for rescinding protections for immigrant students without legal status, saying it unconstitutionally violates their rights on “nothing more than unreasoned executive whim.”

The lawsuit filed in the northern district of California is the first legal effort by a university to block the Trump administration's decision to end protection from deportation of nearly 800,000 young immigrants who were brought to the United States illegally before age 16, completed high school-level education and stayed out of trouble. 

UC President Janet Napolitano, who was an architect of the program in 2012 as U.S. Homeland Security secretary, said the decision to sue the federal government was not taken lightly. The 10-campus system educates about 4,000 students — with teachers, researchers and healthcare providers — who are in the country illegally.  

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
(Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. How did an L.A. County public school district boost its declining enrollment? It started an online school and signed up children attending Catholic schools. A Times special report. 
  2. Betsy DeVos used the expulsion of USC student Matt Boermeeser as an example of how the federal government has created a "failed system" for investigating sexual assault on campus.
  3. L.A. Unified is trying out new sex education lessons as early as fourth grade.

In California:

  1. What DeVos' speech might mean for California schools.
  2. A California lawmaker is pushing for public schools to put free tampons and pads in school bathrooms.

Nationwide:

  1. DeVos announced that she was launching a formal review process to overhaul federal guidelines for handling campus sexual assault.
  2. Five former Education secretaries are pressing Congress to support DACA.
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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • California State University
  • University of California
(Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

California educational leaders vowed Thursday to press on with aggressive action against campus sexual assault despite any future rollback of the federal guidelines that have prompted universities to crack down on the problem.

In a speech Thursday, U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos lambasted Obama-era guidelines as unfair and coercive and announced plans to review them. Later, in an interview with CBS News, she said she intended to rescind the 2011 guidelines, which laid out how campuses should investigate sexual assault cases and lowered the standard of proof needed to find the accused responsible.

  • K-12
(Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

Last spring, Katie Rivera’s daughter came home from the St. Francis Parish School in Bakersfield with some unusual paperwork.

The school was pushing parents to sign their children up for a “unique pilot program” taught entirely online and run by a public school district in Los Angeles County.

Each student who enrolled in the Lennox Virtual Academy would get a free Chromebook computer to use at school, with access to online classes. All parents had to do was fill out the forms, authorizing St. Francis to share information about their finances and their children’s health with the Lennox School District a hundred miles away.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
(Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Thursday reaffirmed her commitment to rewrite or rescind Obama-era guidelines that have prodded colleges and universities to more aggressively — some say too aggressively — investigate campus sexual assaults.

But during a speech at George Mason University in Virginia, DeVos stopped short of relaxing the policy, as some expected she might. She said the department would begin a notice and comment period to gather information and evidence to overhaul the guidelines.

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  • Higher Education
  • K-12
(Christian K. Lee / Los Angeles Times)

Despite President Trump’s removal of the shield that has protected 800,000 Dreamers from deportation, Bryan Peña, 18, refuses to suddenly slink into the shadows. Instead, he plans to get louder, more public, more emphatic about his right to stay.

“This is where I want to live,” Peña said. “This is the only life I know.”

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • For Parents
Jeong Park was 11 when his parents sent him to live in the United States.
Jeong Park was 11 when his parents sent him to live in the United States. (Jeong Park)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. At these L.A. Unified schools, vegan food now is a lunch option.
  2. L.A. Unified's website went down over the Labor Day weekend because of an "accounting issue."

In California:

  1. Answers to some key questions about what the end of DACA could mean for California.
  2. These are the "Dreamers" whose dreams may now be deferred.

Nationwide:

  1. Fifteen states and the District of Columbia filed a lawsuit challenging President Trump's DACA phaseout.
  2. The future of DACA and those dependent on its protections.
  3. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos is expected to announce major changes to Title IX enforcement, potentially detailing new rules on how college campuses should deal with rape.

Adalis Rojas, a senior at South Hills High School in West Covina, on why she decided to not to join in the Pledge of Allegiance at the start of the school day.

This year has been a stage for unacceptable racism —Charlottesville, Va. being a clear example — that has been instigated by Donald Trump’s inexplicable actions. With the new rise of what Newsweek calls “America’s Boy King,” many find their hatred towards minorities justifiable and hide behind Trump, sticking their tongues out at anyone who looks different from them.

Thus, today’s USA has taken a back-to-the-past trip to the 1950s, regressing at the hands of this presidency. Those who stand beside me feel fearful of the threats being thrown at them or from being told that this is not where they belong. What happened to the equality given to all under the American flag? What happened to the ideals that this country was built upon?

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  • K-12
(Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press)

A real-time civics lesson could be coming to some classrooms in Los Angeles whose teachers are among the 800,000 young immigrants currently protected from deportation by DACA.

An organization that could be particularly hard hit by the end of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is Teach for America, which recruits recent college graduates to teach for two years in schools in low-income communities. Some of the recruits decide to stay on as teachers.

TFA-LA has about 230 teachers in Los Angeles, including 16 who have DACA to thank for being able to work without fear of deportation. Twelve other DACA beneficiaries came out of the TFA-LA program and have continued teaching after their two-year stints.

  • Higher Education
(Kirk McKoy / Los Angeles Times)

Major philanthropic gifts by Chinese Americans have surged nearly fivefold to almost $500 million in recent years, with most of the money going to higher education, a new study has found.

Philanthropy by donors in China also soared as the nation’s roaring economy produced more billionaires than in the United States and helped fuel a 430% increase in a decade in the number of registered charitable foundations in China — 5,545 in 2016, the study reported. In 2014, Chinese philanthropic giving reached $16.7 billion.