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1299 posts
  • TV
(Evan Agostini / Invision/Associated Press)

Journalist Ann Curry is returning to PBS to tell the harrowing tales of survivors of major historical events.

The former “Today” show co-anchor, who was unceremoniously dismissed from her NBC post in 2012 and has remained relatively mum on the recent firing of her former costar Matt Lauer, is heading up “We’ll Meet Again,” a six-part historical series on PBS that premieres on Jan. 23.

Curry serves as executive producer and the main reporter on the program, which is co-produced by Blink Films and Ann Curry, Inc. The program explores some of history’s most dramatic events through the personal stories of those who experienced them, PBS said in a statement on Wednesday.

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(Jordan Strauss / Invision)

The impressive cinematic feat of Ridley Scott’s “All the Money in the World” has been undercut yet again by reports that Mark Wahlberg earned a whole lot more money than his costar Michelle Williams during reshoots of the film.

Looks like somebody figured out how Forbes’ highest-paid actor is making all the money in the world.

According to USA Today, Wahlberg reportedly negotiated a $1.5-million payout for the last-minute work on the drama, while Williams earned a meager per diem fee for her work — an estimated $80 each day.

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  • Birthdays
(Vince Compagnone / Los Angeles Times)

There comes a point where you have to do what you want to do. At my age I should be able to sing whatever I want to sing.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: The new standard

Mark Hamill may be one with The Force, but he's taking on another franchise-building character in the go90-streamed animated series “Transformers: Prime Wars Trilogy.” 

Hamill makes his debut as Megatronus (The Fallen), one of the thirteen original Primes, in the finale of the trilogy’s 10-episode second chapter, “Transformers: Titans Return,” released Tuesday.

Megatronus was exiled from Cybertron after murdering one of the other thirteen, Solus Prime, effectively becoming the first Decepticon. In the “Titans Return” finale, Hamill's Megatronus has a deadly showdown with one of the show’s beloved heroes.

  • Awards
  • Politics
Kristen Bell at the nominations for the 75th Golden Globes.
Kristen Bell at the nominations for the 75th Golden Globes. (Chris Pizzello / Invision / AP)

This year marks the first time the ceremony will have an emcee, an honor that falls to actress Kristen Bell.

"She's not our first female host, she's our first host, period, and that says a lot," said Screen Actors Guild Awards committee member Elizabeth McLaughlin on Tuesday at the casting of the statuettes that will be given out at the Jan. 21 ceremony. "I think she's going to do an amazing job. She's hilarious and charming and smart, and I think she's really going to set the tone for the awards this year."

And that's not the only thing this year’s show will be doing different.

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  • Music

Taking it from social media into real life, Lana Del Rey spoke onstage about her escalating dispute with Radiohead over her song “Get Free” at a show in Denver Monday night.

Del Rey claims that the rock group has threatened legal action over the song, which bears some resemblance to its 1992 hit, “Creep.” Though it’s unclear what — if any — measures the band has taken, Del Rey has already posted on Twitter about the dispute, writing, “Although I know my song wasn’t inspired by ‘Creep,’ Radiohead feel it was and want 100% of the publishing.”

At Monday night’s show, Del Rey directly addressed the quarrel onstage and how it may affect future pressings of the album. 

A new trailer for “Krypton” has been released, giving fans their first real look at Syfy’s Superman prequel and its version of the superhero’s homeworld. 

The trailer also offers clues about Adam Strange and how he ties into this House of El origin story. “Krypton,” of course, takes place long before Superman (a.k.a. Kal-El) was born. The show instead follows Seg-El (Superman’s grandfather) and chroicles the rise of the House of El. 

“The story of my family is one of triumph and sacrifice,” says Seg-El (played by Cameron Cuffe) in a voiceover. “How we lead a revolution against tyranny. And now it falls on my shoulders to save my world.”

  • TV
  • TCA18
Rose McGowan speaks at a TCA panel on Tuesday.
Rose McGowan speaks at a TCA panel on Tuesday. (Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images)

Make way for “Citizen Rose.” 

At the Television Critics Assn. winter press tour in Pasadena on Tuesday, Rose McGowan previewed the upcoming unscripted series that documents her transformation from actress to activist, advocate and agitator.  

Fielding questions from a packed room of reporters, she was by turns smart, funny, fierce and vulnerable, dropping quotes from the animated film “Monsters, Inc.,” referencing the ACT UP movement and expressing her desire to “smash the 1%.”

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Former E! News anchor Catt Sadler said she left the network over unequal pay.
Former E! News anchor Catt Sadler said she left the network over unequal pay. (Dimai/Rex Shutterstock)

Former E! News anchor Catt Sadler has become a symbol for gender pay inequality since she left the cable network after determining her male counterpart Jason Kennedy earned twice as much as she did.

Sadler’s move even became a topic on the red carpet for the 75th Golden Globe Awards. “Will & Grace” star Debra Messing told E! correspondent Giuliana Rancic that she was “shocked to hear that E! doesn’t believe in paying their female co-hosts the same as their male co-hosts.”

But Frances Berwick, who oversees E! as president of NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment’s lifestyle networks, took to the stage at the Television Critics Assn. press tour in Pasadena on Tuesday to dispute Sadler’s account.

Darren Criss, left, Edgar Ramírez, Ryan Murphy, Penélope Cruz and Ricky Martin appear at the premiere of their new FX series Monday.
Darren Criss, left, Edgar Ramírez, Ryan Murphy, Penélope Cruz and Ricky Martin appear at the premiere of their new FX series Monday. (Kevin Winter / Getty Images)

Producer Ryan Murphy has fired back at the Versace family for accusing him of creating a work of fiction in his forthcoming anthology, “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story.”

It’s the latest pushback from the real-life subjects of Murphy’s growing portfolio of docudramas — the showrunner’s namesake production company and  FX Networks already are embroiled in a legal battle with veteran actress Olivia de Havilland over her portrayal in 2017’s “Feud: Bette and Joan.”

Though the Versace family has not taken or threatened legal action about its representation in “The Assassination,” its recent statement on the series wholly summarized it as an unauthorized project that the Italian design house had no involvement in.