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(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Ariana Grande was doing just fine — and then one day in May 2017, a 22-year-old suicide attacker decided to set off bombs at the end of her concert at the Manchester Arena and everything changed.

More than a hundred people were injured, 22 were killed and, though she escaped the worst of it when left the stage ahead of the blasts, Grande’s life changed forever.

“It's hard to talk about because so many people have suffered such severe, tremendous loss. But, yeah, it's a real thing,” the pop star says in the July edition of British Vogue, which features her on the cover.

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Magic. Wands. Little weird candies that make you “turn into, like, a lion and stuff.”

These are the things that make dreamy Canadian pop star Shawn Mendes’ heart go pitter-patter about J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter universe.

On Monday night’s installment on Carpool Karaoke, the “Stitches” singer gushed about the magical movies to “Late Late Show” host James Corden as they cruised Los Angeles and sang some of Mendes’ biggest hits. The pop singer even revealed a book he had at home where he had handwritten all the magic spells. 

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(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

Do I think art can change the world? When I have that question in my mind, I think of Bob Dylan, who wrote songs about losers; he romanticized losers. I think he created empathy. How much do you care about other people, or do you just not care about them at all?

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Dolly Parton performing at the Oscars in 2006.
Dolly Parton performing at the Oscars in 2006. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

Dolly Parton is back working 9 to 5 — in the streaming world.

The country-music icon has teamed with Warner Bros. Television and Netflix to produce an anthology series of “television films” based on her songs.

“As a songwriter, I have always enjoyed telling stories through my music. I am thrilled to be bringing some of my favorite songs to life with Netflix,” Parton said in a statement on Monday.

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(Thibault Camus / Associated Press)

Director Woody Allen has weighed in on the #MeToo movement, saying he should be its “poster boy.”

In an extensive interview with Jorge Lanata, reporter for Argentina’s “Periodismo Para Todos,” Allen spoke at length about his support for the larger movement, sparked in part by investigative journalism done by son Ronan Farrow.

“Everyone wants justice to be done,” Allen said. “If there is something like the Me Too movement now, you root for them, you want them to bring to justice these terrible harassers, these people who do all these terrible things. And I think that’s a good thing.”

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Sara Gilbert, left, and Roseanne Barr appear in a scene from "Roseanne."
Sara Gilbert, left, and Roseanne Barr appear in a scene from "Roseanne." (Greg Gayne / ABC via Associated Press)

“Roseanne” star and executive producer Sara Gilbert addressed the show’s cancellation for the first time on Monday’s episode of “The Talk.”

The episode, which followed a week of installments that had been pre-taped before the Roseanne Barr firestorm erupted, started out with co-host Julie Chen reading aloud the tweet Gilbert had written after Barr posted a racist statement about former Obama aide Valerie Jarrett, but before ABC decided not to move forward with new episodes of “Roseanne.”

“I would like to say this has a been a very difficult week,” a solemn Gilbert told the live studio audience. “A lot of people have been hurt by this. I will say that I’m proud of the show we made. The show has always been about diversity, love and inclusion, and it’s sad to see it end in this way. I’m sad for the people who lost their jobs in the process. However, I do stand behind the decision that ABC made.”

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Laura Prepon and Ben Foster.
Laura Prepon and Ben Foster. (Evan Agostini / Associated Press)

Laura Prepon has married fellow actor Ben Foster.

The “Orange Is the New Black” actress confirmed the news on social media on Sunday, sharing a sepia-toned wedding portrait with her new husband that announced they were “Just Married!”

“Thank you for all the love and support. Wishing all of us the good stuff!” Prepon wrote on Instagram and Twitter.

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John Mayer, left, and Andy Cohen appear on "Watch What Happens Live."
John Mayer, left, and Andy Cohen appear on "Watch What Happens Live." (Charles Sykes / Bravo)

As he celebrated his 50th birthday on Sunday’s edition of “Watch What Happens Live,” Andy Cohen got a visit from good buddy John Mayer, and the two got real about their burgeoning bromance. 

“Do you think people wonder if we’re in a secret relationship?” Mayer asked Cohen.

“We get a lot of nods from behind the bar,” he added, talking about the cluster of Cohen’s friends who were acting as the show’s bartenders. 

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(Jordan Strauss / Associated Press)

Pop star Janet Jackson called police on Saturday night to perform a welfare check on her 1-year-old son, who was with her estranged husband.

Los Angeles County Sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to the 22000 block of Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu after receiving a call at 9:55 p.m.

“Deputies responded and there was no evidence of any crime, no report was taken and the baby was well,” said Deputy Wally Bracks of the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department.

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Jimmy Fallon appeared as the surprise commencement speaker for Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.
Jimmy Fallon appeared as the surprise commencement speaker for Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla. (Staff / Sun Sentinel)

After a school shooting took the lives of 17 classmates and teachers in February, the graduates of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School were honored by a surprise celebrity commencement speaker anxious to sing the student body’s praises.

Jimmy Fallon, host of “The Tonight Show,” appeared at the graduation ceremony for the Parkland, Fla., high school on Sunday, sharing nothing but positivity with the gathered students and families. 

“Most commencement speakers get up and talk in future tense: ‘You will succeed. You will make us proud, you will change the world,’” Fallon remarked. “But I’m not going to say that, because you’re not the future. You’re the present.”