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Ludacris and Carrie Underwood.
Ludacris and Carrie Underwood. (Robyn Beck / AFP / Getty Images, left; Michael Loccisano / Getty Images, right)

Sure, Pink is slated to sing the national anthem on Super Bowl Sunday, but Carrie Underwood and Ludacris will kick off the show with a video for “The Champion,” a new song that also will be the anthem for this year’s Winter Olympics.

“When we were writing ‘The Champion,’ our main focus was to celebrate athletes at the top of their game, but we also wanted the song to resonate with people in their everyday lives,” Underwood said in a statement from NBC, which will broadcast the Winter Games from South Korea starting Feb. 9 as well as Super Bowl LII on Feb. 4.

Christopher “Ludacris” Bridges, who is featured on the track, and Underwood, the face and voice of NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” for the past five seasons, wrote the song with Brett James and Chris DeStefano. 

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Hollywood’s biggest talent congregated in an airplane hangar Thursday night for the Broadcast Critics Assn.'s 23rd annual Critics’ Choice Awards.

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California Sen. Dianne Feinstein found herself immortalized in song Thursday night, thanks to a nasty new nickname from President Trump.

The president derided Feinstein on Wednesday after the senator disclosed details of a dossier of allegations about Trump's ties with Russia during his campaign.

But “Late Night With Seth Meyers” did not share the president’s consternation over Feinstein’s actions, instead celebrating the senator through a John Mellencamp-esque song, "Sneaky Dianne.”

Patty Hearst.
Patty Hearst. (Jamie McCarthy / Getty Images)

Fox has pulled the planned film based on the 2016 book “American Heiress” by Jeffrey Toobin that chronicles the 1974 kidnapping of heiress-actress Patricia Hearst. The move comes after Hearst, inspired by the #MeToo movement and Time’s Up demonstrations at the recent Golden Globe Awards, publicly decried the film and unauthorized biography. 

“Twentieth Century Fox Film and its production partners have decided to cancel the studio’s planned project based on the book American Heiress,’ ” the studio said Thursday in a statement.

Earlier that day, in a statement of her own issued through her daughter Lydia Hearst’s publicist, Patty Hearst noted that the book “cites one of my kidnappers as its main source, romanticizes my rape and torture and calls my abduction a ‘rollicking adventure.’ ”

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(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

If someone has not seen you do it before, they assume that you can't do it. I think that they forget that actors are people that act.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Look Who's Funny

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Ellen DeGeneres’ Montecito neighbor Oprah Winfrey became a special correspondent on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” on Wednesday, reporting from the site of their community in central California.

DeGeneres FaceTimed with Winfrey for an episode that aired Thursday, and the daytime TV queens discussed the storms that pounded the coastal community this week and the subsequent mudslides that have claimed 17 lives.

Montecito was still recovering from December’s catastrophic Thomas fire, the largest wildfire in the state’s modern history, which left it and the surrounding area vulnerable to devastating mudslides that wiped out homes and buried the 101 Freeway.

It may seem surprising now, but Ben Whishaw wasn’t supposed to play Paddington.

Eric Clapton, seen performing at the Forum in September 2017, opened up about his health in a new BBC interview.
Eric Clapton, seen performing at the Forum in September 2017, opened up about his health in a new BBC interview. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

Rock legend Eric Clapton has admitted that he’s struggling with hearing loss, according to a new interview with the BBC.

Clapton said that the issue is one of several maladies he’s dealing with as he continues to tour into his 70s.

“I mean, I'm going deaf, I've got tinnitus, my hands just about work,” he said. “I'm hoping that people will come along and see me just because, or maybe more than because, I'm a curiosity. I know that is part of it, because it's amazing to myself I'm still here.”

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Patricia Hearst at the Elton John AIDS Foundation's Academy Awards Viewing Party in 2017.
Patricia Hearst at the Elton John AIDS Foundation's Academy Awards Viewing Party in 2017. (Jamie McCarthy / Getty Images)

Saying she was inspired by what happened at the 75th Golden Globe awards, heiress-actress Patricia Hearst on Thursday publicly decried a planned movie about her 1974 kidnapping as well as the 2016 book the project is based on, “American Heiress” by Jeffrey Toobin.

“’American Heiress,’ which cites one of my kidnappers as its main source, romanticizes my rape and torture and calls my abduction a ‘rollicking adventure,’” Hearst said in a statement issued Thursday through her daughter Lydia Hearst’s publicist.

“This project is attempting to rewrite history and directly flies in the face of the present #MeToo movement where so much progress is being made in regard to listening, and providing a voice, to those who have suffered abuse.”

Demonstrators fill the steps of City Hall during the first Women's March in downtown Los Angeles on Jan. 21, 2017.
Demonstrators fill the steps of City Hall during the first Women's March in downtown Los Angeles on Jan. 21, 2017. (Stuart Palley / For The Times)

Organizers of the Women’s March Los Angeles announced Thursday a list of celebrities who will participate in the 2018 event, slated for Jan. 20.

Scarlett Johansson, Alfre Woodard, Laverne Cox and Olivia Munn are just a few of the stars of stage and screen who will be on hand for the second annual march.

Last year’s Women’s March Los Angeles — held on the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration as president — drew an estimated 750,000 people as part of a national day of action to support women’s rights, human rights, civil liberties and social justice.