Southern California Moments Your photos from around the Southland and beyond
'Quintessential' Los Angeles

In his photography, Josh Rose tries to capture the "archetypes" of Los Angeles.

He alternates between shooting in downtown L.A. and Venice to capture the severe contrasts between the two places "and really what's amazing about this city."

"There’s no city that can incorporate extremes like Los Angeles," Rose said. "Downtown is layered. A rich cultural history, but enveloped in shadows and angles. In Venice, it’s all splayed out - curvy, unclothed and on wheels."

Earlier this month, Rose was walking his usual path in Venice down Abbot Kinney and to the boardwalk, when he saw a man on his bike holding a longboard.

"I watched him go through his ritual of waxing his board and putting his wetsuit on," he said.

For Rose, the scene captured the essence of surfing: to leave everything behind, to be totally present with the ocean.

"It had 'quintessential' written all over it," he said.

Rose used a Leica to make the image.

Follow Sean Greene on Twitter.

Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern...

Read more
In Herald, Calif., a decommissioned nuclear power plant

Alvin Tenpo had seen photos of the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station in Herald, Calif. Its cooling towers looked surreal, so he decided to visit the decommissioned nuclear power facility about 25 miles southeast of Sacramento.

The towers, captured with a long exposure, have a "dystopian feel," he said.  

Tenpo took this photo on April 4 with a Nikon D800.

Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California and California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our Flickr page or tag your photos with #socalmoments or #californiamoments on Instagram and Twitter. Follow us on Twitter or visit latimes.com/socalmoments for more on this photo series.

Read more
Framing the next adventure

You cannot help but gaze deeply into this photograph by Michael Wong for an extended period. It is a magical picture that makes you stare and wonder. The subject is unseen and can be anyone. You wonder what it is that he/she is thinking and what comes next. It can be hopeful or full of despair. It is a picture that can represent your story and your journey. Whether that was intentional or not, you just can’t help but be pulled in by the composition. It’s one of those pictures that asks a lot of questions. First, is it real? Answer: Yes, very real.

On March 28, Wong was on a hike on the Palos Verdes Peninsula with some friends; he took notice of the seascape and rock that lined the shores. He created a picture in his mind that evoked a very specific emotion. The story he created, in his words, is “about a person who is going through a rough patch in life and is at the cusp of a new adventure. Looking out into the horizon, he/she is remembering how to appreciate the little things and to...

Read more
Wise words

Nima Razfar was photographing a subject at the Spring Arcade Building in downtown Los Angeles when he noticed the man who was working security, was watching their shoot with curiosity.  

After the shoot wrapped, the man introduced himself as Many Feathers.

“The name was given to him by his Indian chief because he collected feathers that he stumbled upon while going to the mountains to reflect and meditate,” Razfar said. The feather attached to his earring is one that he found during one of those trips.

Razfar said the feathers were also "symbolic of his Aztec roots and a daily reminder for the freedom of his soul." Many Feathers described himself as former junkie, addicted to hardcore drugs for nearly four decades but finally quit because of his seven grandchildren.

Before they parted ways, Many Feathers left Razfar with some words of wisdom. “If you don’t love yourself, you cannot love others.”

The image was taken with NikonD200.

Follow Trishna Patel on Instagram and Twitter.

Each week,...

Read more
After the eclipse

Clint Cauton didn't wake up early enough to catch the total lunar eclipse on April 4, but he did manage to capture this photo of the moon while part of the Earth's shadow lingered.

He shot the photo just past 6 a.m. at Knoll Hill in San Pedro. The eclipse was the shortest of the century. 

"I like how the moon was illuminated against the dark blue morning sky as it was dipping behind the hills," he said. 

Cauton used a Nikon D7100 with a Nikkor 70-200mm 2.8 VRII lens.

Follow Ebony Bailey on Instagram and Twitter.

Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California and California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our Flickr page or tag your photos with #socalmoments or #californiamoments on Instagram and Twitter. Follow us on Twitter or visit latimes.com/socalmoments for more on this photo series.

Read more
Zuma Beach colors

Parisian Eric Demarcq says he's keen on Los Angeles and California. "I love taking pictures of that beautiful state."

Last month, he had the chance to show his friend Valentina around his favorite California spots during her first visit to the area from Paris. He chose to take a drive on Pacific Coast Highway, "one of the best scenic roads in California," he said.

They ended up at Zuma Beach in Malibu, where Demarcq spotted a colorful scene: a line of birds flying over the food sign and palm trees.

"As soon as we arrived, Valentina had fully fallen in love with this place," he said. "She wanted to stay there indefinitely and did not want to leave."

Demarcq used a Canon 5D Mark III to make the image.

Follow Sean Greene on Twitter.

Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California and California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our Flickr page or tag your photos with #socalmoments or #californiamoments on Instagram and Twitter. Follow us on Twitter or visit latimes.com/socalmoments...

Read more
Loading