Advertisement
1825 posts
Emma Watson arrives at the 2018 Vanity Fair Oscar party on Sunday.
Emma Watson arrives at the 2018 Vanity Fair Oscar party on Sunday. (Dia Dipasupil / Getty Images)

Emma Watson has gamely joined the many armchair copy editors commenting on her new feminist tattoo’s grammatical error. 

The actress and Time’s Up advocate debuted “ink” supporting the anti-harassment movement at the Vanity Fair Oscars party on Sunday night. But, missing a key apostrophe, the large “Times Up” in script on her right inner forearm arm was met by criticism.

A close-up of Emma Watson's "Times Up" tattoo.
A close-up of Emma Watson's "Times Up" tattoo. (Dia Dipasupil / Getty Images)

Thank goodness it’s not a mistake that will last a lifetime — a closer look revealed the edge’s of the tat’s clear sticker, and a message from Watson sealed the deal. 

Advertisement
  • Birthdays
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

I wasn't in the position of being a sex symbol or anything like that. The insight I have is more from the standpoint of what any creative person goes through in the process of growing.

Advertisement
  • Birthdays
(Gary Friedman / Los Angeles Times)

My kids are very funny. The other day ... I was getting mad at [my 9-year-old] and he was getting mad at me, and out of nowhere he said, 'So I guess you'll be taking care of yourself when you get old.' 

“We come in peace, but we mean business,” singer, actress and activist Janelle Monáe repeated Friday afternoon at an intimate brunch in West Hollywood. They were the same words she shared at the 2018 Grammys earlier this year.

  • Birthdays
(Jennifer S. Altman / Los Angeles Times)

I just don't want to be in a box ever where anybody feels I can only do one thing, because it's boring. I feel I have a lot to explore and a lot to give and try and probably fail doing something, but I want the shot to do it.

Advertisement
  • TV
  • Late-night

It takes a lot to raise (or lower) the bar when it comes to strange days in the Trump administration, but this week might have done just that. 

At least that’s the conclusion that Seth Meyers came to on Thursday night’s “Late Night,” where the host dedicated a “Closer Look” segment to dissecting one especially weird week.

Meyers opened with the president’s wildly vacillating policy positions, including on gun reform.

L.A. street artist Plastic Jesus, right, sits on his artwork on Hollywood Boulevard.
L.A. street artist Plastic Jesus, right, sits on his artwork on Hollywood Boulevard. (Damian Dovarganes / Associated Press)

Harvey Weinstein and his bathrobe are back in L.A. for the Academy Awards, in the form of street artist Plastic Jesus’ annual Oscars-adjacent gold statue commenting on a social issue of the day. 

The installation, which went up Thursday morning on Hollywood Boulevard, is titled “Casting Couch” and features the disgraced executive sitting on a chaise longue in pajama pants and a bathrobe, clutching a tiny, perhaps strategically placed Oscar statuette. 

It’s the second high-profile street art installation timed to Sunday’s Academy Awards, following conservative artist Sabo’s “Three Billboards”-style commentary on alleged pedophilia and child sex abuse in Hollywood. 

  • TV
  • Awards
  • Celebrity
Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty announcing the best picture winner at the 2017 Oscars.
Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty announcing the best picture winner at the 2017 Oscars. (Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

Looks like the film academy believes in second chances — even for Bonnie and Clyde.

Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty will reportedly have their shot at Oscars redemption on Sunday after infamously flubbing the best picture winner at last year’s ceremony because of an envelope mix-up. The “Bonnie and Clyde” stars will return to the stage to present the same prize again, according to TMZ.

Representatives for ABC deferred questions about the show to the Academy for Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which did not immediately respond to The Times’ requests for confirmation. 

Advertisement
  • Birthdays
(Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times)

I feel if I get the job, that boosts my ego enough. If a director believes in me enough to give me the job, he can say whatever he wants after that, and it's not going to break me down."

FROM THE ARCHIVES: A scion of our times

O.J Simpson arrives at funeral services in 2005 for Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., who represented him during his murder trial.
O.J Simpson arrives at funeral services in 2005 for Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., who represented him during his murder trial. (Beatrice de Gea)

Fox is planning to air a special featuring what is being described as a “lost interview” with O.J. Simpson in which he gives his thoughts on what happened on the night of the murder of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman.

The two-hour “O.J. Simpson: The Lost Confession?” which will air March 11, will include the “lost”  2006 interview with Simpson conducted by famed book publisher Judith Regan. Simpson during the discussion gives what the network describes as a “hypothetical account” and “disturbing” details about the night of the slayings. 

Soledad O’Brien will host the special, which will also include input by a panel of analysts. Public service announcements about domestic violence awareness will run throughout the special.