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Review: Netflix's new sitcom 'Disjointed' wants to be a stoner 'Cheers'

Aaron Moten, left, Dougie Baldwin and Kathy Bates sell pot to Southern California in the new Netflix comedy "Disjointed." (Robert Voets / Netflix)
Aaron Moten, left, Dougie Baldwin and Kathy Bates sell pot to Southern California in the new Netflix comedy "Disjointed." (Robert Voets / Netflix)

Humans have been laughing at jokes about inebriation at least since Romans wrote comedy. Once it was drunks who were funny — Otis on "The Andy Griffith Show," Foster Brooks, Dean Martin — but drunks just seem like alcoholics now. Marijuana, meanwhile, has moved in — pot jokes long ago entered the mainstream — and with "Disjointed," it now has a whole sitcom of its own.

The series, premiering Friday on Netflix, was created by David Javerbaum (the wonderful Paul F. Tompkins puppet panel show "No, You Shut Up!") and "Two and a Half Men" man Chuck Lorre, the co-creator of CBS’ "Mom," a comedy about substance abuse and recovery. To some degree, this wants to be the stoner "Cheers" — James Burrows, who co-created that series, directed the "Disjointed" pilot.

There are "budtenders" here; a central workplace flirtation; and a coterie of comical regulars who want to go where they almost can remember their name. As on "Cheers," the door to the street is on the left, the one to the office is on the right.

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