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412 posts
  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
  • The Golden State
  • The Swamp
The Trump administration is planning to rollback yet another Obama policy limiting methane emissions from oil and gas well sites.
The Trump administration is planning to rollback yet another Obama policy limiting methane emissions from oil and gas well sites. (Photo courtesy of Dana Caulton)

There’s a certain irony in the timing of a report that the Trump administration is about to lift more restrictions on methane emissions from drilling operations a day after Gov. Jerry Brown signed a new law requiring California to get all of its electricity from zero-carbon sources by 2045.

On the one hand, we have more environmentally irresponsible behavior from the Trump administration, while on the other, the fifth-largest economy in the world steps out — again — as a global leader in the fight to counter the worst effects of climate change.

You can guess which one I’m rooting for.

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
President Trump listens to others speak during a lunch with members of Congress at the White House in late June.
President Trump listens to others speak during a lunch with members of Congress at the White House in late June. (Jabin Botsford / Washington Post)

President Trump’s recent claims about the economy have been so outlandish, even Fox News is correcting him. 

Early Monday morning, Trump claimed this distinction:

Oh for heaven’s sake. It’s a good milestone for sure, but that combination of high growth and low unemployment has been repeated dozens of times since World War II ended. Here’s what Fox News’ research arm had to say:

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  • Opinion
  • Rule of Law
Sen. Kamala Harris speaks with Sen. Cory Booker during confirmation hearings for Brett Kavanaugh on Friday.
Sen. Kamala Harris speaks with Sen. Cory Booker during confirmation hearings for Brett Kavanaugh on Friday. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

Sen. Kamala Harris, one of at least two potential Democratic presidential candidates on the Senate Judiciary Committee, got a lot of eyeballs for the video of part of her interrogation of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

The drama unfolded Wednesday when Harris asked the judge: “Have you discussed [Robert S.] Mueller or his investigation with anyone at Kasowitz Benson Torres, the law firm founded by Marc Kasowitz, President Trump’s personal lawyer?” Sounding like a prosecutor warning of a perjury trap, she added ominously: “Be sure about your answer, sir.”

Kavanaugh, perplexed, asked, “Is there a person you’re talking about?” Harris, unable or unwilling to provide a name, shot back: “I’m asking you a very direct question: Yes or no?” 

  • Opinion
  • The Golden State
Elon Musk, chairman and CEO at Tesla and chairman of SpaceX, inhales what he said was marijuana on a live YouTube webcast on Sept. 6.
Elon Musk, chairman and CEO at Tesla and chairman of SpaceX, inhales what he said was marijuana on a live YouTube webcast on Sept. 6. (Screenshot)

While the business world was scandalized by Elon Musk smoking marijuana on a podcast late Thursday, here’s a reason for Los Angeles to be offended: The city may be getting played by Musk and his tunnel-boring company. 

Mayor Eric Garcetti, the City Council and the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority have all been drafted into working on Musk’s idea to build a network of tunnels under Los Angeles that could whoosh cars or pods of people underground and out of traffic.

City Council members wanted to waive the standard environmental reviews for Musk’s proof-of-concept tunnel, giving the project a free pass rarely extended to other transportation projects. City staff have begun work on the environmental review needed for the Boring Co.’s other project in L.A. — the proposed Dugout Loop, a 3.6-mile underground shuttle to ferry fans to Dodger Stadium.

  • Opinion
  • Rule of Law
Sen. Kamala Harris questions Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Wednesday.
Sen. Kamala Harris questions Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Wednesday. (Jacquelyn Martin / AP)

Among several surreal moments at the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh,  one of the strangest was an encounter Wednesday evening between Sen. Kamala Harris and the nominee.

In full prosecutorial mode, Harris asked Kavanaugh:  “Have you discussed [Robert S.] Mueller or his investigation with anyone at Kasowitz Benson Torres, the law firm founded by Marc Kasowitz, President Trump’s personal lawyer?” She added the portentous warning: “Be sure about your answer, sir.”

Like most people watching, I assumed Harris was about to confront Kavanaugh with evidence that there had been such a potentially problematic conversation, and name the lawyer with whom Kavanaugh supposedly communicated.

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Anonymous descriptions of a choatic White House have President Trump livid.
Anonymous descriptions of a choatic White House have President Trump livid. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The president is not amused. In fact, the one-two punch this week from Bob Woodward’s book detailing the dysfunction in the White House, and Wednesday’s unsigned New York Times op-ed that seemed to verify Woodward’s work even as the White House slammed it, has the administration writhing and reeling.

Here are a few points to focus on.

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter Chief Executive Jack Dorsey testify on Capitol Hill on Wednesday.
Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and Twitter Chief Executive Jack Dorsey testify on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. (Drew Angerer / Getty Images)

Company executives hauled in front of Congress to explain why they haven’t solved this or that problem know that lawmakers are likely to threaten them with new regulations or other sanctions.

And sure enough, that’s what happened when top executives from Facebook and Twitter appeared before the Senate Intelligence Committee to answer questions about their platforms’ vulnerabilities to manipulation and abuse.

What’s unusual was the response from the Trump administration. Just as the hearing was ending, the Justice Department issued a statement saying Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions will meet this month with several state attorneys general “to discuss a growing concern” that social media companies “may be hurting competition and intentionally stifling the free exchange of ideas on their platforms.”

Sen. Dianne Feinstein questions Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Wednesday.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein questions Judge Brett Kavanaugh on Wednesday. (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

For a lot of viewers of Day 2 of Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation hearings, it was the main event: Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s questioning of the Supreme Court nominee about his attitude toward Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 decision legalizing abortion that Feinstein fears Kavanaugh might vote to overturn.

She’s not alone. In an editorial on Tuesday, the Los Angeles Times editorial board, noting that Kavanaugh had told another senator that Roe was “settled law,” suggested that he should be asked to explain what he meant by that term.

So was Kavanaugh reassuring about whether he would leave Roe alone?

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  • Trump
  • We're All Doomed
  • The Witch Hunt
Donald Trump
Donald Trump (Los Angeles Times)

A New York Times op-ed allegedly written by a senior Trump administration official has set the internet ablaze. Its headline: "I am part of the resistance inside the Trump administration." Its premise: A group of Trump appointees is working from the inside to stop the president from fulfilling the parts of his agenda they disagree with.

Obviously, the writer and other like-minded higher-ups are not part of the "resistance" that's marching in the streets protesting.

The piece suggests America is currently under a "two-track presidency." If President Trump wants to do something the people in his administration think is good, they go along with it. If he wants to do something they think is bad, they find ways around it. This is in keeping with what the Bob Woodward book excerpt revealed: Senior officials are taking things off Trump's desk to keep him from seeing them.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
A tent city at Camp Pendleton in 1975 housed Vietnamese refugees who fled after the fall of Saigon.
A tent city at Camp Pendleton in 1975 housed Vietnamese refugees who fled after the fall of Saigon. (Don Bartletti)

In its insatiable quest to rid the U.S. of immigrants, the Trump administration has been rounding up Vietnamese refugees who have been in the country for more than a quarter of a century and trying to send them back to Vietnam — despite a formal bilateral agreement that refugees who arrived here prior to the 1995 normalization of relations between the two countries would not be sent home.

In a number of cases, the refugees have been held in detention centers for months as the government sought to obtain travel documents from the Vietnamese government, and despite a Supreme Court decision that said the government could not detain someone for an extended period of time if it was unlikely the home country would accept the deportee.