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361 posts
  • Trump
  • Opinion
First Lady Melania Trump visits Egypt's Giza pyramids on Saturday, Oct. 6.
First Lady Melania Trump visits Egypt's Giza pyramids on Saturday, Oct. 6. (Saul Loeb/ AFP)

“I wish people would focus on what I do, not what I wear,” Melania Trump told a gaggle of reporters on Saturday, who had gathered in Giza, Egypt, to chronicle her blitz through Africa.

What she’d worn the day before, and what she was referring to, was a pith helmet. Whether planting trees in pale pink stiletto heels, sporting her infamous “I Really Don’t Care, Do U?” Zara jacket to visit children separated from their parents at the border, or tooling around in a 19th century colonial administrator hat, Melania’s sartorial choices have been terribly memorable.

Can’t a woman vogue around the pyramids in a linen suit without being personally victimized by the sexist media?

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  • Opinion
  • Election 2018
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I’m writing this post about the upcoming midterm elections on November 6th, in which I’ll be voting in the state of Tennessee. In the past I’ve been reluctant to publicly voice my political opinions, but due to several events in my life and in the world in the past two years, I feel very differently about that now. I always have and always will cast my vote based on which candidate will protect and fight for the human rights I believe we all deserve in this country. I believe in the fight for LGBTQ rights, and that any form of discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender is WRONG. I believe that the systemic racism we still see in this country towards people of color is terrifying, sickening and prevalent. I cannot vote for someone who will not be willing to fight for dignity for ALL Americans, no matter their skin color, gender or who they love. Running for Senate in the state of Tennessee is a woman named Marsha Blackburn. As much as I have in the past and would like to continue voting for women in office, I cannot support Marsha Blackburn. Her voting record in Congress appalls and terrifies me. She voted against equal pay for women. She voted against the Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, which attempts to protect women from domestic violence, stalking, and date rape. She believes businesses have a right to refuse service to gay couples. She also believes they should not have the right to marry. These are not MY Tennessee values. I will be voting for Phil Bredesen for Senate and Jim Cooper for House of Representatives. Please, please educate yourself on the candidates running in your state and vote based on who most closely represents your values. For a lot of us, we may never find a candidate or party with whom we agree 100% on every issue, but we have to vote anyway. So many intelligent, thoughtful, self-possessed people have turned 18 in the past two years and now have the right and privilege to make their vote count. But first you need to register, which is quick and easy to do. October 9th is the LAST DAY to register to vote in the state of TN. Go to vote.org and you can find all the info. Happy Voting! 🗳😃🌈

A post shared by Taylor Swift (@taylorswift) on

Pop megastar Taylor Swift disrupted the space-time continuum over the weekend by endorsing a Democrat in the race for an open seat on the U.S. Senate in her home state of Tennessee.

This was viewed in some circles as cataclysmic (and in others as overdue) because, like so many contemporary pop hit makers, Swift has kept silent on many of the burning issues of our day. That may be a smart way to hold onto a fan base that crosses geographic ideological lines (although it skews young and female); the oft-cited cautionary tale here is that of the Dixie Chicks, whose criticism of President George W. Bush led many country radio stations to drop them while they were hot. But it also feeds the “shut up and play” mentality toward celebrities — whether it be music, sports or entertainment — that denies them the right to be actual humans with opinions that might just conflict with their fans’ view of the world.

But I digress. What struck me about Swift weighing in was that it wasn’t an endorsement of Democrat Phil Bredesen — a guy with a substantial track record, having served eight years as the state’s governor. Instead, it was a repudiation of Republican Rep. Marsha Blackburn, one of the music industry’s biggest and most reliable allies in Congress.

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A polar bear walks in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a habitat at dire risk from global warming.
A polar bear walks in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, a habitat at dire risk from global warming. (Subhankar Banerjee / Associated Press)

The warning couldn’t be any more clear and direct: Without near-immediate action, the world will fail to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, according to a new and highly anticipated report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. And the chances of the human race actually coming together to address the problem are not very good, the report says.

The result: A radically different environment, with rising seas, species disappearing, food chains in chaos and human migration and competition for resources leading to political instability. The poorest nations and the lowest-lying countries will suffer the most, but there will be plenty of impact to go around from bigger swings in extreme weather (more and stronger hurricanes), more extreme drought and more extreme flooding, depending on where people live.

The temperature rise can be combatted, if political and industry leaders show the will. The IPCC says the rise can be capped at 1.5 C (less than 3 degrees in Fahrenheit) if  global carbon pollution is cut 45% before 2030 (in 12 years), and reaches zero emissions by 2050. As the Guardian reports, “This would require carbon prices that are three to four times higher than for a 2 C target (set in the 2015 Paris agreement). But the costs of doing nothing would be far higher.”

Hell — its contours, qualities and contested existence — is an enduring source of fascination for many of us mortals. Saint Augustine, the fourth-century bishop and philosopher, wrote that “hell, which is also called a lake of fire and brimstone, will be material fire.” A thousand years later, poet Dante Alighieri wrote the Inferno, in which his narrator travels through nine concentric circles of Hell. In this depiction, however, it grows ever colder as they approach the core, where they find Satan trapped in a block of ice up to his waist. Several centuries after that, Robert Frost considered both fire and ice as a means of torture; “either would suffice,” he concluded. (The Bible, for its part, suggests neither.)

  • Opinion
  • Rule of Law
Judge Brett Kavanaugh wrote that he testified "as a son, husband and dad."
Judge Brett Kavanaugh wrote that he testified "as a son, husband and dad." (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

Many who oppose the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh for a seat on the Supreme Court — including the editorial board of the Los Angeles Times — have cited his emotional, and partisan, comments last week when he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee to rebut allegations of sexual abuse.

Kavanaugh railed against a ”calculated and orchestrated political hit, fueled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election” and speculated that he was the victim of “revenge on behalf of the Clintons.” In what sounded like a threat, he warned: “What goes around comes around.”

Kavanaugh’s angry partisanship prompted 2,400 law professors to oppose his confirmation in a letter that said the nominee “displayed a lack of judicial temperament that would be disqualifying for any court, and certainly for elevation to the highest court of this land.”

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
  • Rule of Law
Women protest in front of Trump Tower in New York Thursday against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
Women protest in front of Trump Tower in New York Thursday against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

As the Brett Kavanaugh melodrama nears its conclusion, a few lines from Echo and the Bunnymen’s “The Cutter” come to mind:

      Am I the worthy cross?
      Will I still be soiled
      When the dirt is off?

The Senate vote this morning to curtail debate on Kavanaugh’s nomination all but guarantees that the judge will be elevated to the nation’s highest court. But the incredibly ugly path taken to get to this point has not only put a cloud over Kavanaugh that may never lift, it’s damaged the Senate’s already weak reputation and cast the Supreme Court in more vividly political hues. There’s plenty of blame to go around, so let’s start assigning it.

The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday on whether dementia has left a condemned man ineligible for execution.
The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday on whether dementia has left a condemned man ineligible for execution. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press)

It might be hard to recognize, but there are other things going on in Washington these days besides the two-ring circus of President Trump and Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. For instance: That very court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a death penalty case centering on whether a state can execute someone whose medical condition has left him addled and stripped of memory of the crime for which he is to be executed.

The courts have previously held that it is cruel and unusual punishment to execute someone who doesn’t have a “rational understanding” of what’s happening – generally, the insane and the psychotic. In the case of Vernon Madison, 68, that line gets blurry. When reminded, Madison knows the state of Alabama wants to execute him for the 1985 killing of a police officer. But the knowledge quickly dissipates into fog. A series of strokes have left him brain-damaged and suffering from vascular dementia — the injuries show up on MRIs — with a documented decline in IQ; he’s now incapable of remembering the crime for which he is to be killed. And 33 years of solitary confinement hasn’t helped.

The dementia has left Madison befuddled to the point that he soils himself because he can’t find the toilet next to the bed in his 5-by-8-foot cell. He wants someone to tell his mother that he has suffered strokes; she’s been dead for years. He can’t remember the alphabet past the letter G. He also plans to move to Florida.

Christine Blasey Ford speaks with attorney Michael R. Bromwich at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 27.
Christine Blasey Ford speaks with attorney Michael R. Bromwich at the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 27. (Michael Reynolds / Associated Press)

The FBI’s report on its reopened background check of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is expected to be turned over imminently to the White House and the Senate. 

That report will lack credibility with many Americans — and some senators — if it doesn’t include interviews with the nominee and with Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused the appeals court judge of trying to force himself on her when they were teenagers, a claim he categorically denies.

The bureau reportedly has interviewed people who belonged to Kavanaugh’s high school social circle, including his friend Mark Judge, who, according to Ford, was in the room when she says Kavanaugh assaulted her. Agents also have interviewed Deborah Ramirez, who has claimed that Kavanaugh exposed himself to her at a party when they were students at Yale.

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  • Opinion
  • The Golden State
Voter registration efforts on National Voter Registration Day in Erie, Pa.
Voter registration efforts on National Voter Registration Day in Erie, Pa. (Christopher Millette / Erie Times-News / Associated Press)

The latest state voter registration numbers are out, and though the numbers bode well for democracy, they aren’t looking good for California’s Republican Party.

There are now more Californians signed up to vote than ever — 19,086,589 of them, to be exact, which is 75.81% of those eligible to vote. But the number affiliated with the Republican Party dropped by about 93,000, to a mere 24.5%, just in the last few months.

This is the latest bad news for the state’s GOP, which has been losing ground in the Golden State for many years. Its minority status is reflected in the Democrat-dominated Legislature and the state’s constitutional offices. In May, the California GOP hit the mortifying milestone of losing its second-place status to those registered with no party preference.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • Rule of Law
  • The Swamp
Artist Robin Bell beamed a protest at Trump International Hotel in Washington, the focus of just one of many Trump conflicts of interest.
Artist Robin Bell beamed a protest at Trump International Hotel in Washington, the focus of just one of many Trump conflicts of interest. (Liz Gorman / Robin Bell)

Meanwhile, back to one of the Trump administration’s original scandals: A watchdog group has updated its list of President Trump’s wide-ranging conflicts of interest, offering a depressingly thorough accounting of how he, his family and some top appointees have routinely tripped over the ethics line.

The conflicts are rooted in the nature of the Trump Organization’s businesses, which includes licensing the Trump name for development projects around the world and operating Trump-named golf courses and resorts. Every time the president visits one of his properties for business or recreation — 147 days and counting — he uses the White House to enhance his private business. You can’t buy advertising like that.

Trump announced early on that he had stepped back from decision-making at the family business and turned operations over to two of his sons, Donald Jr. and Eric. But that doesn’t redress the conflicts because Trump still derives income from the businesses, and he knows what they are because his name is plastered all over them.