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426 posts
  • Opinion
  • Election 2018

Idiomatic English is stuffed to the gills with animal imagery (see what I did there?), including several frequently uttered allusions to monkeys.

Inconsiderate passengers monkey with your car radio. A broken bone can throw a monkey wrench into your vacation plans. Finding mistakes in my blog posts can be more fun than a barrel of monkeys.

But as far as I can tell, governors have never been said to monkey up a state’s economy. 

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
President Trump listens as Paula White leads a prayer at the White House.
President Trump listens as Paula White leads a prayer at the White House. (Olivier Douliery / EPA-Shutterstock)

At a lovefest with his evangelical supporters on Monday night at the White House, President Trump boasted about having gotten “rid of” a provision in tax law that prevents churches from endorsing political candidates.

“They really have silenced you,” Trump told the evangelical ministers, according to a recording quoted by the New York Times. “But now you’re not silenced anymore.”

Not for the first time, Trump had his facts wrong.

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  • Opinion
Marianne Jauncey works as medical director at the Medically Supervised Injecting Centre in Sydney, Australia, in 2016.
Marianne Jauncey works as medical director at the Medically Supervised Injecting Centre in Sydney, Australia, in 2016. (Rick Rycroft / Associated Press)

Doesn’t the U.S. Department of Justice have better things to do than threaten cities trying to save people from overdosing on opioids?

California is among a handful of states and cities exploring whether to open safe drug injection sites, clean clinic-like facilities where addicts can use their illicitly obtained drugs under medical supervision so they don’t accidentally give themselves a lethal dose like some 64,000 Americans did in 2016, the most recent year with good data.

This week, the California Legislature gave final approval to a bill to let San Francisco open a safe injection facility — which is fortunate, given that city officials had decided to go ahead with one with or without state approval.

But Deputy U.S. Atty. Gen. Rod Rosenstein warned in an op-ed in the New York Times on Monday that the feds won’t condone this violation of federal law.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • We're All Doomed
President Trump lashed out Tuesday against Google, whose icon is shown here on a mobile phone, for its treatment of conservative news sites.
President Trump lashed out Tuesday against Google, whose icon is shown here on a mobile phone, for its treatment of conservative news sites. (Matt Rourke / Associated Press)

President Trump weighed in again Tuesday on the alleged social media conspiracy against conservatives, this time singling out Alphabet subsidiary Google. You and I might think that news and views from the right (or any ideological vantage point) are surpassingly easy to find online. But Trump argues that Google is doing its part to change that:

Trump evidently based his tweets on reporting by PJ Media’s Paula Bolyard, who compared the results of a Google News search for Trump against a “media bias” chart developed by right-of-center investigative journalist (and vaccine skeptic) Sharyl Attkisson. Even if you don’t accept the findings of the chart, you have to concede one of Bolyard’s points: that Google’s results heavily favor popular mass-market media outlets. 

But here’s the thing. If you compare the search results for “President Trump” on Google against the results from any other search engine — Bing, say, or DuckDuckGo — you’ll get very similar links. So, too, if you search Google for any other topic. Big outlets dominate. (One of which, by the way, is Fox News, which is the most effective pro-Trump outlet on the planet.)

Pope Francis prays at Knock Shrine in County Mayo, Ireland, on Sunday.
Pope Francis prays at Knock Shrine in County Mayo, Ireland, on Sunday. (AFP/Getty Images)

Let’s stipulate, as the lawyers say, that an Italian archbishop had an ideological ax to grind when he claimed that Pope Francis lifted the restrictions his predecessor had placed on a cardinal accused of sexual misconduct. Go ahead and assume for the sake of argument that Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano — a former Vatican ambassador in Washington, D.C., — was disgruntled and out for revenge.

That doesn’t mean the pope can continue to refuse to comment on it.

Vigano accused Francis of reversing a decision by Pope Benedict XVI to impose limitations on the activities of then-Cardinal Theodore McCarrick, the former archbishop of Washington, D.C., who according to news reports had a a 50-year history of sexual relations with male seminarians and young priests. (After a church investigation found credible an accusation that McCarrick also had abused a minor, Francis accepted his resignation from the College of Cardinals.)

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  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • The Witch Hunt
Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions said he wouldn't be "improperly influenced by political considerations."
Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions said he wouldn't be "improperly influenced by political considerations." (Mandel Ngan / AFP-Getty Images)

It’s not news that President Trump is disappointed in Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions. He long has been grumbling over the attorney general’s decision to recuse himself from matters related to the 2016 presidential campaign, a decision that eventually led to the appointment of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III to investigate Russia’s election interference and possible coordination with the Trump campaign. (Or, as Trump calls it, the “rigged witch hunt.”

But Trump’s complaints about Sessions have always extended beyond the Russia recusal. He also has seethed over the fact that the Justice Department isn’t pursuing the president’s political opponents. In November he tweeted: "Everybody is asking why the Justice Department (and FBI) isn't looking into all of the dishonesty going on with Crooked Hillary and the Dems.”

This week Trump sharpened that critique in an interview aired by Fox News  in which he complained that “I put in an attorney general that never took control of the Justice Department” — a department, he insisted, with a pro-Democratic tilt.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • The Swamp
  • Election 2018
As scandals swirl around President Trump, Republican leaders stand silent.
As scandals swirl around President Trump, Republican leaders stand silent. (Alex Brandon/AFP/Getty Images)

At this point you have to wonder how far Donald Trump has to go — maybe shooting someone on Fifth Avenue? — before his fellow Republicans say, “Enough.”

Although the party establishment initially opposed Trump, with his victory the party has become him. In truth, though, elements of the party establishment didn’t have far to go to get to Trumpism. Remember that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) froze nomination hearings for President Obama’s Supreme Court choice under the specious argument that it wasn’t Obama’s seat to fill because he only had 10 months left in his term. So the nation got Justice Neil Gorsuch instead of Justice Merrick Garland.

  • Opinion
  • The Swamp
  • Election 2018
 Rep. Duncan Hunter appears in 2011.
Rep. Duncan Hunter appears in 2011. (Carolyn Kaster / Associated Press)

In a perfect world, Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine) would announce on Thursday that he’s taking a leave of absence — preferably, right after he is arraigned on charges that he and his wife raided his campaign war chest for more than a quarter of a million dollars to buy personal things and then altered documents to hide the pilfering from federal elections officials.

As part of the announcement Hunter would say that, as much as it pains him, he knows that he would be too distracted by the case to be an effective member of Congress. It wouldn’t be fair to his constituents to continue. For that matter, he also would say that even though it is too late to have his name removed from the Nov. 6 ballot, he is suspending his reelection campaign.

And then, in this perfect world, the San Diego County congressional district would vote for the other guy on the ballot, no matter the political designation next to his name. After all, it is better to have a clean congressional representative from a different party than gamble on reelecting someone who may soon be a felon. Right?

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  • The Witch Hunt
Donald Trump appears at the Republican National Convention in 2016.
Donald Trump appears at the Republican National Convention in 2016. (Brian van der Brug)

What a week. The president's former lawyer says he was directed to violate campaign finance law to influence the election at the behest of Donald Trump. Oh, and he says he's got some Russia stuff he thinks Robert S. Mueller III might be interested in. The president's former campaign chairman became a convicted felon. One of the first congressional representatives to publicly throw his support behind Trump has been indicted for improper use of campaign funds.

It is only Wednesday.

Here in the lamestream fake news media, this is all a big deal. But as far as Trump supporters are concerned, it's barely a blip.

  • Trump
  • Opinion
  • The Witch Hunt
A courtroom sketch of Michael Cohen.
A courtroom sketch of Michael Cohen. (Elizabeth Williams / Associated Press)

President Trump broke his silence about his former lawyer Michael Cohen on Wednesday morning on Twitter (where else?), and he did not disappoint. 

He opened as he usually does, attacking Cohen personally:

Yawn. Not much to get excited about there. But then he tweeted this: