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  • White House
  • North Korea
President Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe meet at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., on April 17.
President Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe meet at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla., on April 17. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press)

President Trump used Twitter to confirm a secret meeting between CIA Director Mike Pompeo and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, writing on Wednesday morning that talks between the two men “went very smoothly” and “a good relationship was formed.”

Trump tweeted that the meeting in North Korea was a prelude to a summit between himself and Kim by early June.

Pompeo is Trump’s nominee to become secretary of State, but a divided Senate oversight committee is expected to decline to recommend his confirmation. However, the full Senate, under Republicans’ control, still is expected to approve him.

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(Associated Press)

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, shot back Tuesday at a senior White House advisor who claimed she apparently was confused when she disclosed plans to impose new sanctions on Russia.

“With all due respect, I don’t get confused,” Haley said on Fox News.

The kerfuffle suggested that Haley, who is the public face of U.S. diplomacy since a new secretary of State has not been confirmed, had been authorized to announce on Sunday that new sanctions aimed at Russia were coming Monday.

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A former FBI agent has been charged with leaking classified records to a news site.
A former FBI agent has been charged with leaking classified records to a news site. (Getty Images)

A former FBI agent in Minneapolis who says he was angry about racial targeting by the bureau has pleaded guilty to leaking classified documents to a news organization.

Terry Albury, 39, pleaded guilty on Tuesday to two charges of revealing national defense information and, under sentencing guidelines, is expected to serve three or four years in prison.

“Today, Terry Albury admitted to violating his oath to protect our country by disclosing to a reporter classified information that, as an FBI agent, he was entrusted to protect,” said Assistant Atty. Gen. John C. Demers.

  • Russia

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Tuesday that he would block bipartisan legislation intended to protect special counsel Robert S. Mueller III from being fired by President Trump.

“I'm the one who decides what we take to the floor,” McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, told Fox News, adding, “We will not be having this on the floor of the Senate.”

McConnell said that while he wouldn’t support Mueller’s removal, he doesn’t think Trump would take that step. However, multiple reports have said that the president in the past has ordered aides to fire Mueller or he considered doing so.

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(CIA)

U.S. senators are clamoring to learn more about the role Gina Haspel, President Trump’s nominee for CIA director, played in the torture of terrorism suspects after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

But the CIA isn’t ready to talk publicly about that yet, instead releasing on Tuesday a description of how Haspel helped guide the country’s foreign espionage efforts since she was named deputy director in February 2017.

Before she rose to the CIA’s No. 2 job, Haspel spent more than three decades as an undercover operative, working overseas and at agency headquarters in Langley, Va. 

(Olivier Douliery / Abaca Press)

The office of Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, routinely puts out a roundup of the morning’s news headlines that may or may not involve her work.

But on Tuesday, those headlines were less than flattering:

“President Trump walks back Russia sanctions” that Haley had announced the day before, one said. Haley “got out ahead of things this time,” White House says.

  • White House
  • Immigration
(Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

President Trump’s temporary truce with Gov. Jerry Brown didn’t last long. Tuesday, he blamed Brown for failing to reach an agreement with the administration to send members of the National Guard to the U.S.-Mexican border.

“The high crime rate will only get higher,” Trump warned in a tweet.

Trump’s fight with the state thawed for a moment last week after Brown agreed to send 400 members of the Guard to help along the border.

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States that have passed laws legalizing recreational marijuana in recent years appear to have found some new, unexpected supporters: Republican politicians.

Former First Lady Barbara Bush
Former First Lady Barbara Bush (Tom Pennington / Getty Images)

Former First Lady Barbara Bush will not seek any additional medical treatment, according to a statement released by the office of George H.W. Bush on Sunday.

The 92-year-old who was described in the statement as "a rock in the face of her failing health," will instead focus on comfort care.

"It will not surprise those who know her that Barbara Bush has been a rock in the face of her failing health, worrying not for herself — thanks to her abiding faith — but for others. She is surrounded by a family she adores, and appreciates the many kind messages and especially the prayers she is receiving,” it read.