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Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar testifying at a Senate committee hearing Tuesday.
Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar testifying at a Senate committee hearing Tuesday. (Associated Press)

The Trump administration will not reunite any migrant children with parents still held in immigrant detention facilities unless current federal law changes first, a top administration official told Congress on Tuesday.

The statement by Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, whose agency currently has custody of 2,047 children who were separated from their parents after being apprehended crossing the border illegally, confirmed what immigrant advocates have feared: The administration will reunite children with their parents quickly only if the parents drop their claims for asylum in the U.S. and agree to be deported.

Under administration policy, immigrants claiming asylum are held in detention awaiting a hearing — a process that can often take months or years. Because current law allows children to be held in immigrant detention facilities for no more than 20 days, Azar’s agency would not place any of the children with parents who are in those facilities, he said.

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Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) questions witnesses during a hearing in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 28, 2009.
Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles) questions witnesses during a hearing in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 28, 2009. (Charles Dharapak / Associated Press)

President Trump says Congresswoman Maxine Waters should “be careful” after she urged the public to “push back” against administration members. 

Trump criticized the California Democrat in a tweet Monday. The president renewed his claim that he considers Waters “an extraordinarily low IQ person” and said she's become the “Face of the Democrat Party” along with fellow California Democrat Nancy Pelosi. Trump added: “Be careful what you wish for Max!” 

Waters is a vocal Trump critic who has been calling for his impeachment. She told rally-goers in her Los Angeles district over the weekend to “push back” on Trump administration members when they're in public and “tell them they're not welcome.” 

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The Supreme Court on Tuesday dealt a blow to a California law that requires faith-based crisis pregnancy centers to notify patients that the state offers subsidized medical care, including abortions.

The decision, on a 5-4 vote, did not strike down the law but sent the case back to lower courts for further review, suggesting the centers were likely to win. The majority questioned whether the disclosure rule amounts to compelled speech that violates the 1st Amendment.

The Supreme Court today upheld President Trump’s ban on travelers from six nations, ruling that the chief executive has the power to target foreign nations and block their citizens from entering this country.

The 5-4 ruling rejected arguments that Trump overstepped his authority under the immigration laws and that his targeting of mostly Muslim-majority countries amounted to unconstitutional religious discrimination.

U.S. Border Patrol agents have stopped handing parents over to the Justice Department for prosecution when they are caught crossing the border illegally with their children, the head of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency said Monday.

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President Trump stood before a crowd of small-business owners at a hotel here last week and said that his administration’s economic policy could “be summed up in three very beautiful words … jobs, jobs, jobs.”

The recent public shaming of Trump administration officials in restaurants has triggered a fierce internal debate among Democrats over how far they should go in confronting the president and his policies.

Sarah Sanders made comments on the Red Hen in Lexington, Virginia.

A restaurant in Lexington, Va., refused to serve White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders on the basis of her political views. Sanders and President Trump tweeted their outrage at the Red Hen eatery, as did a slew of others.

Another restaurant nearly 200 miles away was caught in the cross-hairs. Though the two have no affiliation and share only the same name, Sanders defenders directed their anger at the Washington, D.C., establishment nonetheless.

Aside from address, ownership and menu, there’s another major difference between the two restaurants – the law. The D.C. Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination on a myriad of subjects including political affiliation. That’s not the case in Virginia, where much like the majority of states, the list includes sex, religion, gender, color and national origin – as directed by the Civil Rights Act of 1964 – but not political affiliation. And although political discrimination is not allowed in Virginia when it comes to employment, the same does not apply to patronage at businesses.  

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White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders addresses the news that a Virginia restaurant asked her to leave because of her association with President Trump.

“Healthy debate on ideas and political philosophy is important, but the calls for harassment and push for any Trump supporter to avoid the public is unacceptable.”