Advertisement
1065 posts
  • Russia
President Trump leaves the White House for a Republican retreat in West Virginia on Thursday.
President Trump leaves the White House for a Republican retreat in West Virginia on Thursday. (Olivier Douliery / Abaca Press)

President Trump will likely tell the House Intelligence Committee on Friday that it can release the controversial memo about secret surveillance used during the Russia investigation, according to a senior administration official.

“The president is OK with it,” the official said. “I doubt there will be any redactions. It’s in Congress’ hands after that.”

Trump’s approval appeared preordained on Tuesday night when Trump said he “100%” supported the memo’s publication publication.

Advertisement

The chances of a bipartisan immigration deal benefiting so-called Dreamers looked more remote the day after President Trump made his pitch in his State of the Union speech, as Democrats saw not an overture but an escalation of his divisive rhetoric.

Advertisement

Thomas Shannon, one of America’s highest-ranking and longest-serving diplomats, said Thursday that he plans to retire, the latest in a steady stream of departures from the State Department since President Trump took office. 

Shannon, who is undersecretary for political affairs, told his staff in a letter that after more than 34 years at State, “I have decided it is time to step aside.”

Unlike several senior diplomats who have quit to protest Trump administration policies, Shannon took pains to say he was stepping down for personal reasons, not political.

Advertisement
  • Russia
A former spokesman for President Trump’s legal team is reportedly planning to tell special counsel Robert S. Mueller III that White House Communications Director Hope Hicks said Donald Trump Jr.’s emails about the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting with Russians “will never get out” in a previously undisclosed conference call, according to the New York Times.

A former spokesman for President Trump’s legal team is reportedly planning to tell special counsel Robert S. Mueller III that White House Communications Director Hope Hicks said Donald Trump Jr.’s emails about the June 2016 Trump Tower meeting with Russians “will never get out” in a previously undisclosed conference call, according to the New York Times

The New York Times reports that Mark Corallo, who resigned from Trump’s legal team in July, was concerned that Hicks “could be contemplating obstructing justice.” A lawyer for Hicks denied the allegations to the New York Times.

When news of the Trump Tower meeting first broke, the White House released a statement saying that the meeting was primarily about Russian adoptions. However, emails showed that Trump Jr. accepted the meeting after being promised dirt on Hillary Clinton. 

  • White House

President Trump seems to have a fixation with the size of his audiences — and with getting the numbers wrong. He was wrong again Thursday, falsely claiming that the broadcast audience for his first State of the Union address was “the highest number in history.”

After a rare three consecutive days of not starting his day on Twitter and stirring up controversy, Trump shed his restraints, tweeting twice against congressional Democrats and a third time boasting that his audience of 45.6 million viewers for Tuesday’s night’s address broke all records.

It didn’t.

A spokesman for Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Tulare) said the adjustments were only “minor edits.”

Rep. Devin Nunes “secretly altered” a classified and controversial memo about secret surveillance during the 2016 presidential campaign before he sent it to the White House for review, Rep. Adam Schiff said on Wednesday night.

A spokesman for Nunes (R-Tulare), who chairs the House Intelligence Committee, said the adjustments were only “minor edits” and brushed off the accusation from Schiff (D-Burbank), the panel’s ranking Democrat.

In a letter to Nunes, Schiff wrote that “material changes” modified the four-page document that members of Congress were able to read before the GOP-led House Intelligence Committee voted along party lines Monday to release it. 

Advertisement
Janet L. Yellen at her last news conference as chairwoman of the Federal Reserve, in December.
Janet L. Yellen at her last news conference as chairwoman of the Federal Reserve, in December. (Brendan Smialowski / AFP/Getty Images)

Federal Reserve officials left interest rates unchanged on Wednesday even as they gave an upbeat assessment of the economy and predicted that inflation would finally move up this year — a signal that rates could rise faster than expected in coming months. 

It was the Fed’s first monetary policy meeting of the year and the last for Janet L. Yellen, who steps down as chairwoman at the end of this week after four years in the job. She will be replaced by Fed governor Jerome Powell.

Policymakers voted unanimously after their two-day meeting to keep the Fed’s benchmark short-term interest rate at a range of 1.25% to 1.5%. That’s a little less than inflation; hence, monetary policy remains supportive of labor-market and economic growth.

  • White House
  • Congress
  • Russia
President Trump told a congressman after his State of the Union speech Tuesday night that he “100%” intended to make the memo public.
President Trump told a congressman after his State of the Union speech Tuesday night that he “100%” intended to make the memo public. (Susan Walsh / Associated Press)

The FBI, in an official statement, said Wednesday it has “grave concerns” about the accuracy of a classified memo prepared by Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee.

The memo, which reportedly alleges that the FBI abused its surveillance authority in connection with a secret court warrant, should not be released, the bureau said in the statement, warning that the memo excludes essential information and is misleading.

“We have grave concerns about material omissions of fact that fundamentally impact the memo’s accuracy,” the statement said.