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Advocates for so-called Dreamers protest outside Trump Tower in New York on Sept. 5, 2017.
Advocates for so-called Dreamers protest outside Trump Tower in New York on Sept. 5, 2017. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

President Trump on Thursday threatened to veto a bipartisan Senate immigration plan, all but ensuring the collapse of an effort to protect Dreamers from deportation in exchange for $25 billion for border security.

The veto threat is the first of Trump's presidency, a bold move against an effort that had been painstakingly crafted by a group of 16 senators, Republicans and Democrats, working weeks behind closed doors on a consensus.

10:28 a.m. This post was updated with staff reporting.

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(Paul Drinkwater / NBC)

Lest anyone doubt that Oprah Winfrey is not running for president, the billionaire media mogul is insisting — one more time — that she really, really means it.

“I am actually humbled by the fact that people think that I could be a leader of the free world, but it's just not in my spirit," she told “60 Minutes Overtime” in a web video interview released Thursday. “It's not in my DNA.”

Winfrey, now a special correspondent for “60 Minutes,” sparked talk of a presidential run with her rousing speech on sexual harassment at the Golden Globes in early January.

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Immigration activists hang a banner in the Capitol building in Washington recently.
Immigration activists hang a banner in the Capitol building in Washington recently. (John Moore / Getty Images)

Even as a bipartisan team in the Senate worked on a compromise bill to protect so-called Dreamers, the proposal came under an unusually sharp partisan attack by the federal departments that enforce immigration law.

In a statement issued before dawn Thursday, the Department of Homeland Security blasted the bipartisan deal in apocalyptic terms, saying “it would be the end of immigration enforcement in America.”

The proposal, which would include protections for Dreamers and $25 billion for a border wall and other security measures, “would effectively make the United States a Sanctuary Nation where ignoring the rule of law is encouraged,” the statement said.

Anti-travel ban protesters gather outside a federal courthouse in Seattle in December 2017.
Anti-travel ban protesters gather outside a federal courthouse in Seattle in December 2017. (Ted S. Warren / Associated Press)

A federal appeals court said Thursday that President Trump’s latest travel ban targeting nationals of six Muslim-majority countries unconstitutionally discriminates against Muslims.

The Richmond, Va.-based U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals’ 9-4 vote makes it the second federal appellate court to say the ban is illegal since it went into effect in September.

The San Francisco-based U.S. 9th Circuit ruled in December that the travel ban violated federal immigration law.

President Trump urged Americans to embrace the “dignity of life” in the wake of the deadly school shooting in south Florida on Thursday but sidestepped the idea of amending gun laws to stem the nation’s epidemic of mass shootings.

In a somber address to the nation from the White House, Trump urged listeners to “answer hate with love, answer cruelty with kindness.”

Trump said he would visit Parkland soon. He ignored a reporter who shouted, "Will you do something about guns?”

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Florida shooting suspect Nikolas Cruz was charged Thursday with 17 counts of premeditated murder as yet another community grappled with grief and horror in the aftermath of a school gun rampage, the deadliest in more than five years.
(Drew Angerer / AFP/Getty Images)

Mitt Romney postponed the expected launch of his campaign for U.S. Senate on Wednesday as a result of the Florida school shooting that left 17 people dead.

Romney had planned to announce his candidacy in a video scheduled for release Thursday morning, followed by a speech Friday night at the Utah County Republican Party's annual fundraising dinner in Provo.

Romney is still expected to attend the dinner Friday night.

(Don Emmert / AFP)

The day after President Trump’s top intelligence advisor warned that Russian hackers will be back with a vengeance in the upcoming midterm election, House Democrats intensified their push to shore up the nation’s network of wheezing voting machines that are vulnerable to attack.

The Democrats released a voluminous report detailing the many ways in which election systems are ripe to breached, and the 2016 incidents in which at least one state’s voter registration files were penetrated and 20 others were targeted for various forms of cyberattack.

Election officials and many lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are growing increasingly alarmed by how vulnerable their voting systems are. Many are still using machines that are easily hacked, and they have no money to fix them. Congress has so far balked at approving any of the bipartisan measures that address the problem, such as the Secure Elections Act championed by  Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and others.

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Former Trump advisor Rob Porter left the White House last week.
Former Trump advisor Rob Porter left the White House last week. (Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump broke his weeklong silence on spousal abuse Wednesday, but only after declaring that everyone already knows his view on the subject.

“I am totally opposed to domestic violence of any kind,” Trump said, according to a pool report by Newsday reporter Laura Figueroa. “Everyone knows that and it almost wouldn’t even have to be said.”

It wasn’t said, for more than a week, as his White House has reeled from the resignations of two high-ranking officials accused of violence against former partners. The women told their stories months ago to FBI investigators conducting background checks on White House aides Rob Porter and David Sorenson, but the men did not leave the White House staff until the accounts went public.

Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin speaks during a House Committee on Veterans' Affairs hearing on Feb. 6.
Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin speaks during a House Committee on Veterans' Affairs hearing on Feb. 6. (Jacquelyn Martin / Associated Press)

Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, traveling on what he said was an "essential" trip to London and Copenhagen, improperly accepted Wimbledon tickets and brought along his wife at taxpayer expense, according to a scathing new inspector general's report.

The report says Shulkin and some top staff members made a number of false and misleading statements both to justify the $122,334 trip and in defending it afterwards. His chief of staff, Vivieca Wright Simpson, doctored an email to convince an agency ethics lawyer to approve a $4,300 flight for Shulkin's wife, the report found.

Another aide devoted "many hours" to arranging for tourist activities for Shulkin and his wife, the report found, "time that should have been spent conducting official VA business and not for providing personal travel concierge services."