Advertisement
1205 posts

CNN President Jeff Zucker says another suspicious package addressed to CNN was intercepted Monday at an Atlanta post office.

Zucker announced that there is no imminent danger to the CNN Center.

Atlanta police have confirmed they responded to a report of a suspicious package at a post office Monday morning.

Advertisement

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) stopped in Oceanside on Friday to stump for Mike Levin, a Democrat running to flip retiring Rep. Darrell Issa’s seat from the Republican column. 

The senator hit familiar notes from the outset, calling for the overturn of the Supreme Court’s  “disastrous” Citizens United decision and the raising of the national minimum wage to $15 per hour.

“Today, we tell corporate America that we, Mike and I and others, are going to stop this corporate greed and create an economy that’s going to work for the middle class,” he said. 

Advertisement

Federal and local authorities on Friday were examining a suspicious package that was addressed to U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and discovered at a mail facility in Sacramento.

Alfred Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City
Alfred Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City (Associated Press)

No one has been hurt or killed — at least, not yet. But the wave of mail bombs targeting prominent Democrats this week has angered and dismayed some of the people affected personally by past acts of political violence in the United States.

In the past 60 years alone, there have been scores of deadly incidents motivated by ideology. The perpetrators range from Ku Klux Klan racists to members of the far-left Weather Underground to antiabortion extremists who killed abortion-providing doctors.

The mail-bomb scare has reopened old wounds for Lisa McNair, whose life was shaped by a deadly blast that occurred a year before she was born: the Klan bombing that killed four black girls at 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, on Sept. 15, 1963. Her sister, Denise, just 11 years old, was the youngest victim.

Advertisement
(Jim Watson / AFP/Getty Images)

Former Director of National Intelligence James R. Clapper says he is not surprised he has been targeted with a suspicious package.

Clapper told CNN Friday morning that the devices sent to prominent critics of President Trump in recent days were "definitely domestic terrorism."

Two officials told the Associated Press that a package was discovered at a postal facility in Midtown Manhattan. One official said it was addressed to Clapper. The officials weren't authorized to discuss the investigation and spoke on condition of anonymity.

  • White House
  • Russia
John Bolton at a news briefing in Tbilisi, Georgia, on Oct. 26.
John Bolton at a news briefing in Tbilisi, Georgia, on Oct. 26. (Shakh Aivazov / Associated Press)

National security advisor John Bolton said Friday that Russian President Vladimir Putin has been invited to visit Washington next year.

Bolton said in the ex-Soviet nation of Georgia: "We have invited President Putin to Washington after the first of the year for, basically, a full day of consultations."

He said no date has been set.

Michael Bloomberg’s political action committee has launched a major ad campaign aimed at unseating Republican Reps. Dana Rohrabacher of Costa Mesa and Steve Knight of Palmdale.

Advertisement
Democrat Harley Rouda, who is challenging Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Costa Mesa), raised more than $1 million in 17 days.
Democrat Harley Rouda, who is challenging Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Costa Mesa), raised more than $1 million in 17 days. (Mario Tama / Getty Images)

A lot can happen in 17 days.

Take the latest federal campaign finance reporting period, which ran from Oct. 1 to 17, the last snapshot we’ll get of California congressional candidates’ financial positions before election day.

In that time, Democrat Katie Hill spent just under $2 million on her campaign in the 25th Congressional District, about as much as Republican incumbent Steve Knight of Palmdale has spent in the entire two-year cycle.

The crowd outside campaign headquarters was boiling, the angry mood matching south Florida’s tropical heat, as Nancy Pelosi arrived to a shower of obscenities and crude insults in English and Spanish.