Advertisement
890 posts
Rod Rosenstein speaks May 1 in Washington
Rod Rosenstein speaks May 1 in Washington (Andrew Harnik / Associated Press)

Deputy Atty. Gen. Rod Rosenstein is taking aim at Republican lawmakers who have drafted articles of impeachment against him, saying that he would not comment on documents "that nobody has the courage to put their name on" and asserting that he will not change his behavior in the face of threats.

"I think they should understand by now that the Department of Justice is not going to be extorted," Rosenstein said Tuesday. "We're going to do what's required by the rule of law, and any kind of threats that anybody makes are not going to affect the way we do our job."

Rosenstein's comments came at the end of a wide-ranging conversation at the Newseum in Washington to commemorate Law Day, which happened to fall a day after the Washington Post reported that conservative allies of President Trump had drafted impeachment articles against the Justice Department's No. 2 official.

Advertisement

President Trump has decided to postpone for another month the decision about whether to impose steep tariffs on steel and aluminum imported from Canada, Mexico and the European Union, the White House announced Monday evening.

Advertisement
President Trump with members of the U.S. Military Academy football team and coaches.
President Trump with members of the U.S. Military Academy football team and coaches. (Alex Wong / Getty Images)

For President Trump, space may not be the final frontier, but the next one.

On Tuesday, as he awarded the U.S. Military Academy football team the Commander-in-Chief’s Trophy, in recognition of West Point’s victories against the other service academies, Trump noted that the military is currently divided into five branches.

“We’re actually thinking of a sixth and that would be the Space Force,” the president told assembled guests in the Rose Garden, after ticking off the names of the Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard.

President Trump reacted Tuesday morning to a New York Times story that listed questions given to Trump's attorneys by the special counsel.
President Trump reacted Tuesday morning to a New York Times story that listed questions given to Trump's attorneys by the special counsel. (Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA/Shutterstock)

President Trump said Tuesday it's "disgraceful" that a list of questions that the special counsel investigating Russian election interference wants to ask him was "leaked" to the news media.

The New York Times late Monday published the nearly four dozen questions given to Trump's attorneys, covering Trump's motivations for firing FBI Director James Comey last May and contacts between Trump campaign officials and Russians.

"It is so disgraceful that the questions concerning the Russian Witch Hunt were 'leaked' to the media," Trump tweeted Tuesday. "No questions on Collusion. Oh, I see...you have a made up, phony crime, Collusion, that never existed, and an investigation begun with illegally leaked classified information. Nice!"

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly listens during a working lunch with President Trump at the White House on March 20.
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly listens during a working lunch with President Trump at the White House on March 20. (Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly is calling a report that he called President Trump an idiot “total BS.” 

Kelly, in a statement, says he and Trump have “an incredibly candid and strong relationship.” 

He adds, “He always knows where I stand and he and I both know this story is total BS.” 

Advertisement

House members stream down the Capitol steps early on a Wednesday evening, just after the last votes of the week. Some lawmakers linger, planning to fly home the next morning, but Rep. Juan Vargas rushes down the steps in jeans and a windbreaker — his travel wear.

Ronny Jackson
Ronny Jackson (Alex Brandon / Associated Press)

Ronny Jackson, a Navy rear admiral whom President Trump unsuccessfully nominated to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, will not return to his previous role as the president's personal physician, a White House official said Sunday.

Jackson, who withdrew as Trump's VA pick last week, will remain on as part of the White House medical unit, the official added. Sean Conley, a Navy veteran who took over Jackson's responsibilities after his nomination, will remain in the role as Trump's personal doctor.

Jackson, a former combat physician who faced criticism almost immediately that he was not qualified to oversee the VA Department, withdrew his nomination Thursday, after the office of Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) released allegations against Jackson that he drank on the job, over-prescribed medication and presided over a toxic work environment.

Advertisement
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (Thomas Coex / EPA/Shutterstock)

Iran was the principal subject of discussion during Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s lightning-quick visit Sunday to Israel, a four-hour stop during which he met with Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu in Tel Aviv.

The two reiterated declarations of personal friendship and the close alliance between the United States and Israel, but at the end of a six-minute news conference in which they took no questions, several questions dividing the two nations remained unresolved.

The principal matter separating Israel and the United States continues to be Iran’s growing presence in Syria, an enemy state lying along Israel’s northern border, that has been riven by a bloody civil war for seven years.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Saudi Foreign Minister Adel Jubeir shake hands during a news conference in Riyadh on Sunday.
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Saudi Foreign Minister Adel Jubeir shake hands during a news conference in Riyadh on Sunday. (Fayez Nureldine / Getty Images)

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, on his first trip to the Middle East as America’s top diplomat, sought to muster support Sunday for a more robust international response to what U.S. officials see as a growing threat emanating from Iran.

Speaking to reporters in Saudi Arabia, Iran’s main regional adversary, Pompeo said the multi-party agreement reached in 2015 to curb Tehran’s nuclear program did not do enough to contain the Islamic Republic. “In fact, Iran has only behaved worse since the deal was approved,” he said.

The former CIA director cited Iran’s support for the “murderous” government of Syrian President Bashar Assad and also accused the country of arming Houthi rebels in Yemen who have repeatedly targeted Saudi cities with ballistic missiles — a charge denied by Tehran.