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(Wong Maye-E, Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press)

President Trump on Wednesday announced that North Korea had released three American captives to visiting Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, a conciliatory signal from Kim Jong Un’s government ahead of a planned summit between him and the president.

Trump broke the news on Twitter, saying that Pompeo was returning after a brief visit with “3 wonderful gentlemen that everyone is so looking forward to meeting.” In a second tweet, Trump said he would be at Joint Base Andrews to greet them when they arrive at 2 a.m. Thursday.

Trump did not identify them as hostages or name them. But the president, who has taken a particular interest in individual hostage cases, had been hinting of their imminent release for days.

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The fight over net neutrality is back.

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President Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani.
President Trump and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. (Jim Lo Scalzo / EPA; Iranian Presidency Office via Associated Press)

President Trump announced Tuesday the U.S. will pull out of the landmark nuclear accord with Iran, dealing a profound blow to U.S. allies and potentially deepening the president's isolation on the world stage. 

“The United States does not make empty threats,” he said in a televised address. 

Trump's decision means Iran's government must now decide whether to follow the U.S. and withdraw or try to salvage what's left of the deal. Iran has offered conflicting statements about what it may do — and the answer may depend on exactly how Trump exits the agreement. 

Attorney General Jeff Sessions visits San Diego, where he speaks on the Trump Administration's immigration enforcement...

Posted by ABC News on Monday, May 7, 2018
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  • White House
  • Middle East
Representatives of several countries and the EU pose in Switzerland on April 2, 2015, the day an Iran deal framework was announced.
Representatives of several countries and the EU pose in Switzerland on April 2, 2015, the day an Iran deal framework was announced. (AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump has announced that his long-awaited decision on whether to tear up the Iran nuclear deal would come Tuesday.

The announcement could well be one of the most consequential of his presidency. And in typical Trump fashion, he teased it on Monday with a tweet.

Trump has long criticized the deal — brokered by the United States, Britain, Russia, France, China and Germany — promising during and after his campaign that he would tear it up. His new national security advisor, John Bolton, is also a major opponent.

A National Guard unit in 2007 patrols at the U.S. border with Mexico in Sasabe, Ariz.
A National Guard unit in 2007 patrols at the U.S. border with Mexico in Sasabe, Ariz. (Ross D. Franklin / Associated Press)

The Trump administration on Monday will unveil a new, tougher border enforcement policy to stem the flow of illegal crossings.

The crackdown, which took effect last week and will be formally announced later Monday, will mean that parents bringing children over the border illegally will likely be separated if caught, according to an official at the Department of Homeland Security, who did not want to be identified before the policy was unveiled.

Currently in many cases border agents try to keep family units together by sending all members to the same family detention facility. Now in most cases parents will be prosecuted and children sent to a separate refugee facility, the official said.

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Gina Haspel attends the ceremonial swearing-in of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the State Department on May 2.
Gina Haspel attends the ceremonial swearing-in of Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at the State Department on May 2. (Shawn Thew / EPA / Shutterstock)

President Trump on Monday tweeted in support of his nominee for CIA director, Gina Haspel, saying she’s “come under fire because she was too tough on Terrorists.”

Haspel, a veteran undercover operative, faces stiff criticism from Democrats and some Republicans for her role in the agency’s interrogation program during the George W. Bush administration, which involved waterboarding and other techniques that are widely considered torture. 

On Sunday, the Washington Post reported that Haspel suggested withdrawing her nomination because of concerns about a difficult confirmation hearing, scheduled for Wednesday. After discussions with White House officials, she decided to stick it out, the report said. 

The tweets are nothing new, coming at all hours and sometimes dozens in a single weekend.