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(Don Emmert / AFP / Getty Images)

As President Trump’s lawyer acknowledged on Thursday, the president has one less excuse to put off an interview with special counsel Robert S. Mueller III now that he has canceled his summit with North Korea’s leader.

Trump announced on Thursday that he was pulling out of the summit with Kim Jong Un, which had been scheduled for June 12 in Singapore.

Rudy Giuliani, the former New York City mayor representing the president, said that frees up some time in his schedule. 

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In 1925, at the behest of New York merchants, Congress passed the Federal Arbitration Act to uphold as “valid, irrevocable and enforceable” the contracts they had negotiated for shipping and delivering goods. They agreed to settle disputes through private arbitration, which was seen as quicker and cheaper than going to court.

Moderate Republicans are giving their colleagues until June 7 to find a legislative fix for the legal status of people brought to the country illegally as children, or they will try to use a special process to force a vote over the GOP leaders’ objections, Rep. Jeff Denham (R-Turlock) said Thursday.

President Trump on Thursday signed bipartisan legislation rolling back some of the Dodd-Frank financial rules put in place after the 2008 financial crisis, touting another victory for his deregulatory agenda.

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(Evan Vucci / Associated Press)

President Trump said he is “waiting” to see if North Korean leader Kim Jong Un will again “engage in constructive dialogue.” 

Trump opened the door for diplomacy Thursday just hours after he canceled a summit with Kim scheduled for next month in Singapore. 

But he insisted that Kim reach out, placing the blame on the North Korean leader for the collapse of negotiations. 

Then-CIA Director Mike Pompeo, left, meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang in late April.
Then-CIA Director Mike Pompeo, left, meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang in late April. (White House)

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says he was involved in discussions late Wednesday and early Thursday that led to President Trump's decision to pull out of a planned summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. But, he would not say exactly which, if any, other countries were given a heads up on the decision, including South Korea. 

“I don't want to get into who all we notified,” he told the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, adding: “The White House will speak to that at the appropriate time.” 

However, Pompeo, who met at the State Department on Wednesday with China's foreign minister, did say that he had not spoken to Chinese officials since the decision was made. 

President Trump welcomes South Korean President Moon Jae-in to the White House on May 22.
President Trump welcomes South Korean President Moon Jae-in to the White House on May 22. (Manuel Balce Ceneta / Associated Press)

South Korean President Moon Jae-in's office says it is trying to figure out President Trump's intentions in canceling a summit next month with North Korea's leader. 

Moon played a prominent role in planning for the summit with Kim Jong Un, which was scheduled for June 12 in Singapore. 

South Korea's Yonhap News Agency quoted a presidential office spokesman as saying South Korea’s leaders “are trying to figure out what President Trump's intention is and the exact meaning of it.” 

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President Trump has canceled the planned June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

President Trump has canceled the planned June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, citing the "tremendous anger and open hostility" in recent statements from Pyongyang.

In a letter released from the White House, Trump urged Kim to "call me or write" if he changes his mind. "This missed opportunity is a truly sad moment in history," he added. 

(Matt York / Associated Press)

President Trump praised the NFL’s decision to fine teams whose players kneel in protest during the national anthem, then took his criticism of protesters one step further in a new interview on Fox News.

“You have to stand, proudly, for the national anthem,” Trump said. “Otherwise you shouldn’t be playing, you shouldn’t be there. Maybe you shouldn’t be in the country.”

The interview was recorded Wednesday and broadcast Thursday morning on “Fox & Friends,” a favorite program of the president’s.