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In Helsinki, President Trump said of meddling in the 2016 election:  "I have President Putin, he just said it's not Russia; I will say this: I don't say any reason why it would be." Tuesday, the day after, Trump said he meant to say the word "wouldn't."

President Trump, seeking to stanch a national furor, said on Tuesday that he misspoke in Helsinki, Finland, and meant to say that he indeed does see Russia as the culprit that interfered in the 2016 presidential election, just as U.S. intelligence agencies have found.

The president's comments were unlikely to satisfy his critics in both parties. His new version was undercut by his fuller and widely watched remarks on Monday. Also, Trump no longer was speaking alongside Russia's President Vladimir Putin, but addressing reporters from the White House alongside Republican lawmakers.

In his attempt to walk back his Helsinki remarks, Trump said he accepts the consensus of American intelligence agencies that Russia interfered in the election. Yet in a sign that he cannot fully accept those findings — seeing them as a challenge to his legitimacy — he added that it "could be other people also." That assertion is not supported by known intelligence.

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The fight over who will lead House Democrats next year got its first public entrance Tuesday as Rep. Linda T. Sanchez made her official bid to lead the House Democratic Caucus.

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Robert S. Mueller III on Capitol Hill in 2013.
Robert S. Mueller III on Capitol Hill in 2013. (Alex Wong / Getty Images)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III is seeking immunity for five potential witnesses in the upcoming trial of President Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort.

Mueller's office told a federal judge in Virginia on Tuesday that it was seeking to compel the witnesses to testify under condition of immunity. 

Prosecutors have not identified the witnesses and say they have not been publicly identified with the case. Prosecutors say the witnesses have indicated they won't testify “on the basis of their privilege against self-incrimination.” Prosecutors say that if they do testify, they are requesting “use immunity.” That means the government couldn't use their statements against them. 

President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin hold a joint news conference after their summit on in Helsinki, Finland.
President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin hold a joint news conference after their summit on in Helsinki, Finland. (Chris McGrath / Getty Images)

President Trump says he meant the opposite when he said in Helsinki that he doesn't see why Russia would have interfered in the 2016 U.S. election. 

Back at the White House on Tuesday, the president told reporters that he said he meant he doesn't see why Russia “wouldn't” be responsible. 

He also said he accepts the American intelligence community's conclusion that Russia interfered in the election, but he denied that his campaign had colluded in the effort. 

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Russia's President Vladimir Putin offers a ball from the 2018 World Cup to President Trump during a joint news conference in Helsinki.
Russia's President Vladimir Putin offers a ball from the 2018 World Cup to President Trump during a joint news conference in Helsinki. (Yuri Kadobnov / AFP/Getty Images)

President Trump will make remarks Tuesday afternoon about his meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, as he faces mounting criticism from allies and foes alike about his failure to publicly condemn Russia’s meddling in the 2016 election. 

Press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders says Trump will speak about Monday’s summit with Putin in Helsinki before a scheduled 2 p.m. meeting with Republican members of Congress at the White House. 

The White House says Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady of Texas and five other lawmakers are to be in attendance. The meeting had been set to be about tax policy. 

President Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin attend a joint press conference in Helsinki on Monday.
President Trump and Russia's President Vladimir Putin attend a joint press conference in Helsinki on Monday. (Brendan Smialowski / AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump is unbowed by bipartisan criticism of his meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin. 

In a Tuesday tweet the President calls the Monday summit in Helsinki “even better” than his meeting with NATO allies last week in Brussels. 

Trump is facing bipartisan criticism for his refusal to publicly challenge Putin over Russia's election hacking and for doubting U.S. intelligence agency conclusions about Russian meddling in the 2016 campaign. Trump backers, including House Speaker Paul Ryan, Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Bob Corker, and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich have criticized his performance. 

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President Trump’s Monday meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, Finland, drew heated reactions from Washington insiders and politicians of all stripes, with many expressing disappointment that Trump wasn’t more confrontational with Putin following the latest revelations in the investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., issued a statement saying there is "no question" that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election, adding that "the president must appreciate that Russia is not our ally" and that the country "remains hostile to our most basic values and ideals."

Some of Ryan’s fellow GOP members took to Twitter to express their dismay:

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Security staff grapple with a man before a news conference by President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin.
Security staff grapple with a man before a news conference by President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

An apparent protester was removed from a joint news conference between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin on Monday. 

The individual, seated with the American press corps in Helsinki, Finland, was holding a sign about nuclear weapons. He identified himself as a reporter from the liberal magazine the Nation.

A Secret Service agent spoke with the unidentified man before Finnish security physically escorted him from the room minutes before the two presidents entered to begin their news conference.