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President Trump speaks during a retreat with Republican lawmakers at Camp David this month. (Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)
President Trump speaks during a retreat with Republican lawmakers at Camp David this month. (Saul Loeb / AFP/Getty Images)

The furor over President Trump’s language about immigrants from “shithole countries” has partially obscured the substance of what he was demanding and the profound shift among Republicans beyond opposing illegal immigration to also pushing new limits on legal migrants, particularly those of color.

Trump made the remark as he rejected a bipartisan proposal from Sens. Richard J. Durbin (D-Ill.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) to resolve the status of some 700,000 so-called Dreamers facing deportation. In exchange for protecting them, Trump wanted more restrictions on legal migrants from Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America, among other changes.

Those demands come as Trump has already put the country on track to remove 1 million immigrants over the next two years. Among them are the Dreamers — young immigrants who came to the U.S. illegally as children — and more than 200,000 Salvadorans, nearly 60,000 Haitians and others from Central America who have lived in the U.S. legally, in some cases for decades, under temporary protected status plans that the administration is ending.

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Chelsea Manning
Chelsea Manning (Andy Kropa / Associated Press)

Chelsea Manning is running for the U.S. Senate in Maryland.

The transgender former Army soldier who was convicted of leaking classified documents filed her statement of candidacy with the Federal Election Commission on Thursday.

The Washington Post reported Saturday that Manning will challenge Democrat Ben Cardin. He has served two terms and is an overwhelming favorite to win.

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Michael Cohen, President Trump's personal lawyer, brokered a $130,000 payment to an adult film actress to prevent her from publicly discussing an alleged sexual encounter with Trump, the Wall Street Journal reported.
Michael Cohen, President Trump's personal lawyer, brokered a $130,000 payment to an adult film actress to prevent her from publicly discussing an alleged sexual encounter with Trump, the Wall Street Journal reported. (Associated Press)

President Trump’s personal lawyer brokered a $130,000 payment to a porn actress to prevent her from publicly discussing an alleged sexual encounter with Trump, according to a report Friday in the Wall Street Journal.

Trump met Stephanie Clifford, whose goes by the name Stormy Daniels in films, at a golf event in 2006, a year after Trump's marriage to his wife, Melania, according to the the Journal. Clifford began talking with ABC News in the fall of 2016 for a story involving an alleged relationship with Trump, but reached a $130,000 deal a month before the election, which prevented her from going public, the newspaper said.

Trump's longtime attorney Michael Cohen arranged for the payment through Clifford's lawyer, Keith Davidson, the Journal reported.

For Joe Arpaio, it’s as if he never left.

On Saturday, in his first public appearance since he announced his candidacy for a Senate seat here, Arpaio attended a gathering of Maricopa County Republicans.

“You’re loved, Joe,” said a woman, placing both hands on his cheeks.

  • White House
  • Congress
  • Immigration

Two Republican senators who hastily joined an immigration meeting at the White House this week said Friday they do not recall President Trump using vulgar language to describe countries in Africa and elsewhere.

The White House has not disputed reports that Trump complained about immigrants from “shithole” countries during the meeting.

Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.) said Friday that Trump definitely made the remark, and two Republican senators said they had been told about it by others in the meeting. 

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  • White House
  • Immigration
Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin, the Senate’s second-ranking Democrat, said President Trump “said things which were hate-filled, vile and racist” during a meeting on Thursday .

Illinois Sen. Richard Durbin, the Senate’s second-ranking Democrat, said President Trump “said things which were hate-filled, vile and racist” during a meeting on Thursday with a bipartisan group of lawmakers, refuting Trump’s denials that he slurred immigrants from what Trump called “shithole” countries.

“I cannot believe that in the history of the White House, in that Oval Office, any president has ever spoken words that I personally heard our president speak yesterday,” Durbin told reporters on Friday, after Trump tweeted a denial of sorts.

“I’ve seen the comments in the press,” Durbin continued, referring to reports about the White House meeting that he attended. “I have not read one of them that’s inaccurate.”

(Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

From the moment he launched his candidacy by attacking Mexican immigrants as criminals, President Trump has returned time and again to language that is racially charged and, to many, insensitive and highly offensive.

Whether it is a calculated strategy to appeal to less tolerant and broadminded supporters or simply a filter-free chief executive saying what’s on his mind, the cycle is by now familiar: The president speaks, critics respond with outrage, and Trump’s defenders accuse his critics of hysterically overreacting.

The latest instance came Thursday, during a White House meeting with congressional lawmakers on immigration. Trump asked why the United States would accept immigrants from “shithole countries” in Africa and the Caribbean rather than people from places such as Norway, according to two people briefed on the meeting.

(Mark Wilson / Getty Images)

President Trump conceded early Friday that he used “tough” language during a closed-door immigration meeting the day before, but implied that reports he complained about the U.S. accepting migrants from “shithole countries” were wrong.

“The language used by me at the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used,” Trump tweeted. “What was really tough was the outlandish proposal made — a big setback for DACA!”

In other tweets posted Friday morning, Trump complained about a bipartisan immigration deal that senators outlined to him at the White House meeting. He said it would force the U.S. "to take large numbers of people from high crime … countries which are doing badly." The tweets backed up the notion that Trump views immigration policy in terms of favorable and unfavorable countries, not on the individual merit of would-be immigrants, as he says.

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(Jean-Christophe Bott / EPA)

President Trump, who campaigned as a champion of “the forgotten” men and women and against global elites, raised eyebrows this week when the White House announced he would attend the elites’ annual get-together: the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. 

Now comes word he’ll hardly be going alone to the Alpine resort.

The White House on Thursday announced an unusually large presidential delegation for the trip this month, including seven Cabinet secretaries and several high-ranking West Wing officials, among them Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner. Also going are the head of the Food and Drug Administration and unnamed guests.

Stephen K. Bannon
Stephen K. Bannon (Patrick Semansky / Associated Press)

With his wounds still fresh after a vicious falling-out with President Trump, former White House chief strategist Stephen K. Bannon is expected to testify behind closed doors to the House Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, according to a source with knowledge of the schedule. 

The House committee is one of at least three congressional panels investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign. Bannon has not previously testified before any of them, or, as far as is known, before special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, who is conducting a separate criminal investigation.

Bannon’s testimony before the House panel has been expected since last month, when his name was added to a roster of upcoming interviews. But his appearance comes at a dramatic moment.