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  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
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  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
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  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election

This morning Californians will see the first clash between six of California’s top candidates for governor, with front-runner Gavin Newsom expected to take the brunt of the attacks on the debate stage at USC.
 
Newsom leads in the polls and, by a wide margin, in fundraising, which could mean that the rest of the field will be battling for second place in the June primary.
 
But in California, second place is good enough. Under the state’s top-two primary system, only the two candidates who receive the most votes in June will win a ticket to the November general election.
 
Until now, voters have had only a few small tastes of the candidates going after one another on stage.
 
During a candidate forum in October between the top four Democrats in the race, former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa accused Newsom of “selling snake oil” when he promised to support a state-sponsored single-payer healthcare system, but didn’t say how he would pay for it.
 
Newsom brushed off the charge, saying he proved it could be done while he was mayor of San Francisco, when the city enacted the nation’s first municipal universal healthcare system.
 
Republican candidates John Cox and Travis Allen also went after each other during the first GOP debate, in the Inland Empire earlier this month, with the sharpest and most frequent barbs traded over their support — or lack of it — for President Trump.
 
The newest Republican to join the race, former Sacramento Republican Doug Ose, was not invited to the USC town hall — and he wasn’t not too happy about it
 
With six candidates on stage and only 90 minutes to carve out their political positions, the town hall is expected to serve as a display of each candidate’s style, demeanor and political reflexes rather than a showing off the depth of their knowledge of the issues facing California.
 
The candidate town hall is being hosted by USC, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas and the Empowerment Congress, a nonprofit civil organization in Los Angeles.
 
KABC-TV news anchor Marc Brown will moderate the debate along with KPCC-FM public radio political reporter Mary Plummer.

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  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
Assemblyman Travis Allen (R-Huntington Beach) speaks at a Tea Party conference in Fresno in August.
Assemblyman Travis Allen (R-Huntington Beach) speaks at a Tea Party conference in Fresno in August. (Silvia Flores / For The Times)

Assemblyman and gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen (R-Huntington Beach) said Friday that a protracted court battle prevented him from collecting signatures to qualify an initiative to repeal California’s new gas tax increase.

He said he will support a campaign for a similar ballot measure backed by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. and rival GOP candidate for governor John Cox.

“What we are excited about is partnering with one of the state’s oldest and most respected taxpayer watchdog groups to make sure that we hold Jerry Brown to his campaign promise of no new taxes without a vote of the people,” Allen said. “I’m very excited to begin going up and down the state helping to collect the signatures we will need to repeal Jerry Brown’s gas tax.”

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Assemblyman Travis Allen (R-Huntington Beach) speaks at a Tea Party conference in Fresno in August.
Assemblyman Travis Allen (R-Huntington Beach) speaks at a Tea Party conference in Fresno in August. (Silvia Flores / For The Times)

Assemblyman and gubernatorial candidate Travis Allen (R-Huntington Beach) said Friday that a protracted court battle prevented him from collecting signatures to qualify an initiative to repeal California’s new gas tax increase.

He said he will support a campaign for a similar ballot measure backed by the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Assn. and rival GOP candidate for governor John Cox.

“What we are excited about is partnering with one of the state’s oldest and most respected taxpayer watchdog groups to make sure that we hold Jerry Brown to his campaign promise of no new taxes without a vote of the people,” Allen said. “I’m very excited to begin going up and down the state helping to collect the signatures we will need to repeal Jerry Brown’s gas tax.”

  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
Mount SAC board member Jay Chen is running for the 39th Congressional District.
Mount SAC board member Jay Chen is running for the 39th Congressional District. (Tom Zasadzinski)

Another Democrat has joined the race for the 39th Congressional District, days after 13-term Republican Rep. Ed Royce said he would retire.

Jay Chen, a Mount San Antonio Community College trustee, announced his bid Friday on Facebook. He’s the only Democrat to enter the race so far with experience in political campaigning for himself.

Chen, 39, ran against Royce in 2012 and lost, getting 42% to Royce’s 58%.