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A camouflaged Jaguar I-Pace on a November test run in Los Angeles. The all-electric compact SUV goes on sale in mid-2018.
A camouflaged Jaguar I-Pace on a November test run in Los Angeles. The all-electric compact SUV goes on sale in mid-2018. (Jaguar)

California Gov. Jerry Brown wants to put 5 million electric cars on the state’s roads by 2030.

Brown announced the new goal in his State of the State speech this week, and formalized the target in an executive order issued Friday.

“This executive order aims to curb carbon pollution from cars and trucks and boost the number of zero-emission vehicles driven in California,” Brown said in a statement.

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Times journalists annotated Gov. Jerry Brown’s State of the State speech. If you see a passage highlighted in yellow, you can click on it to see what we have to say about it. You can also highlight passages and leave your own comments.

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  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
  • California Democrats
John Chiang, from left, John Cox, Gavin Newsom, debate hosts Jorge Ramos and Ilia Calderon, Antonio Villaraigosa, Travis Allen and Delaine Eastin.
John Chiang, from left, John Cox, Gavin Newsom, debate hosts Jorge Ramos and Ilia Calderon, Antonio Villaraigosa, Travis Allen and Delaine Eastin. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

The candidates who hope to be California's next governor clashed Thursday about immigration, healthcare and how they made their fortunes at a boisterous debate in front of a packed hall with a predominantly Latino audience.

As the clout of Latino voters continues to grow in California, the governor's race could hinge on which candidate appeals most to this critical slice of the electorate. Many of the debate's questions revolved around immigration, a touchstone issue to many in the audience.

But front-runners Gavin Newsom and Antonio Villaraigosa also unleashed deeply personal attacks in the debate at UCLA’s Royce Hall over how the other made his money, a shift from the policy spats that have emerged in prior clashes.

In his 16th and final State of the State address, Gov. Jerry Brown largely pivoted away from familiar warnings about California’s future to instead offer a valedictory message on what’s been accomplished since his unprecedented return to Sacramento in 2011.

  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats
(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

Former congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and her husband, astronaut Mark Kelly, will endorse Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom for governor on Friday.

Giffords was shot in the head while meeting with constituents in 2011. She and Kelly have become ardent gun control activists since her recovery.

Peter Ambler, the executive director of the Giffords’ Courage to Fight Gun Violence group, said the couple is endorsing Newsom because of his history of action on progressive causes, notably Proposition 63.

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  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
  • California Democrats
  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
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  • State government
 A customer test-sniffs the cannabis at the MedMen dispensary in West Hollywood this month.
A customer test-sniffs the cannabis at the MedMen dispensary in West Hollywood this month. (Eugene Garcia /EPA-EFE / REX / Shutterstock)

Just weeks after California began licensing marijuana sales, a state lawmaker on Thursday proposed legislation to allow financial institutions to handle money from cannabis businesses.

Because marijuana remains an illegal drug under federal law, federally insured and regulated banks have refused to conduct transactions with firms profiting from the drug.

That has state officials worried about robberies and other crimes as hundreds of state-licensed marijuana business are forced to conduct many transactions, such as paying taxes, with large amounts of cash.

Sen. Tony Mendoza had his leave of absence extended up to 60 days on Thursday.
Sen. Tony Mendoza had his leave of absence extended up to 60 days on Thursday. (Steve Yeater / Associated Press)

A state Senate panel voted unanimously Thursday to extend the leave of absence taken by Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia) by up to 60 days to allow the completion of an investigation into sexual harassment complaints, even though the senator has not agreed to an extension beyond his planned Feb. 1 return date.

The bipartisan action by the Senate Rules Committee came after the full Senate voted 27-9 following a heated debate to grant the rules panel the power to extend leaves taken by legislators.

Democratic senators said Mendoza should not be allowed to return to work next week before the investigation is completed because it would send the wrong message and be intimidating to women who work in the Capitol who have complained about him.