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Former state Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia) casts his vote for a Democratic party endorsement last month.
Former state Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia) casts his vote for a Democratic party endorsement last month. (Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times)

The chairman of the California Democratic Party has asked the secretary of state to reject Tony Mendoza’s ballot designation as “state senator,” saying it is misleading because Mendoza resigned from the Senate last month under threat of expulsion over sexual harassment allegations.

Party Chairman Eric Bauman said in a letter released Thursday that “law and common decency dictate” that Mendoza, a Democrat from Artesia, should be required to describe himself another way on the ballot.

Mendoza is running to reclaim the 32nd Senate District seat in a special election June 5  for the last six months of the current term, and for a new four-year term.

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  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Don Leach / Daily Pilot)

Three congressional Democrats who represent Orange County are endorsing Harley Rouda in the race against Republican Rep. Dana Rohrabacher.

Reps. Lou Correa, Alan Lowenthal and Linda Sanchez, who is also vice chair of the Democratic caucus, all announced their endorsement of Rouda on Thursday morning. 

In a statement, Sanchez said Rouda “represents the best choice to move California’s 48th Congressional District forward.”

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A Los Angeles lawmaker says California needs new statewide laws that boost earthquake safety, and wants to toughen rules on how strong new buildings should be and require cities to identify buildings at risk of collapse.

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  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
President Trump speaks while touring the border wall prototypes near the Otay Mesa Port of Entry in San Diego County.
President Trump speaks while touring the border wall prototypes near the Otay Mesa Port of Entry in San Diego County. (K.C. Alfred / San Diego Union-Tribune)

President Trump vowed earlier this year to stump for Republicans in competitive House races, saying he would spend "probably four or five days a week" helping GOP candidates get elected. As he made his first visit to California, a state with several seats in play, few Republicans seemed interested in taking him up on his offer.

A presidential visit in an election year often comes with an entourage of local officials and candidates hoping to catch a photo op or ride his coattails. But in Southern California, a hotbed of the left's resistance out West that could prove crucial in the midterms, many aren’t eager to appear with Trump.

Breaking with tradition, no members of Congress traveled to California on Air Force One. When Trump arrived in San Diego on Tuesday morning, he was met at different points by retiring Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista) and the other Republican congressman from the area, Rep. Duncan D. Hunter of Alpine.

  • California Democrats

More than 30 California state lawmakers walked out of the Capitol on Wednesday morning to support national student protests for stricter gun laws.

The legislators, joined by staff members and young people, stood in silence for 17 minutes in homage to the 17 people who lost their lives at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., last month.

“Today’s actions in silence were the loudest advocacy for gun control in the history of America,” said Assemblyman Reggie Jones-Sawyer (D-Los Angeles) after the protest.

  • California Legislature
Proposed rules would prevent companies from varying access to streaming videos and other online content.
Proposed rules would prevent companies from varying access to streaming videos and other online content. (Getty Images/iStockphoto)

A state senator on Wednesday unveiled his full proposal to restore net neutrality in California, a set of rules to prevent internet service providers from manipulating or hindering access to online content.

The latest version of Senate Bill 822 by Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) would bar broadband companies doing business in the state from blocking, throttling or interfering with a customer’s internet access based on the nature of the content or type of service. It also would prevent providers from varying speeds between websites, or charging customers additional fees for their services to reach more people.

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  • California Legislature
Supporters of single-payer healthcare march to the state Capitol on April 26, 2017, in Sacramento.
Supporters of single-payer healthcare march to the state Capitol on April 26, 2017, in Sacramento. (Rich Pedroncelli)

As progressive activists clamor for California to push ahead a sweeping single-payer health plan, a legislative report released Tuesday cautioned that such an overhaul would take years.

The report, which marks the end of months of Assembly hearings on paths to achieving universal healthcare, lays out a number of options lawmakers can pursue in the near term to improve how Californians get and pay for healthcare.

The report estimated that a healthcare overhaul that would cover all Californians under one system with public financing — including those who are insured through their employer and Medi-Cal or Medicare — would probably be a multiyear process to determine what kind of benefit would be provided. It would include how the system would be paid for, how to overcome state constitutional hurdles and how to obtain necessary permission from the federal government.

A Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student stops at a memorial following students' return to school in Parkland, Fla.
A Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student stops at a memorial following students' return to school in Parkland, Fla. (Getty Images)

Californians who buy guns or ammunition would have to pay a new fee to fund more counselors and safety officers at schools under legislation proposed in response to the recent mass shooting at a Florida high school.

Assemblyman Jim Cooper (D-Elk Grove) said his bill would strengthen counseling support at California’s 1,400 middle schools and junior high schools while providing more armed school resource officers at high schools.

“It sickens me to think about all the kids who have lost their lives in the school shootings that are plaguing our country,” Cooper said in a statement on Tuesday. “Arming teachers is not good public policy and shouldn’t be considered.”