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244 posts
  • California Legislature
One option the A's are considering for a new stadium is redeveloping the site of their current home, Oakland Coliseum.
One option the A's are considering for a new stadium is redeveloping the site of their current home, Oakland Coliseum. (D. Ross Cameron / Associated Press)

A proposed new ballpark for the Oakland A’s would have an easier path to construction through new legislation introduced this week.

Assembly Bill 734 from Assemblyman Rob Bonta (D-Alameda) would provide shortcuts to approval should the ballpark proposal face challenges under California’s primary environmental law governing development. The bill would encourage judges to decide any lawsuit under the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA, within nine months and prohibit a judge from stopping construction on the ballpark unless there were imminent life and safety risks.

“It’s a great project that will create good jobs and benefit the city of Oakland,” Bonta said.

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We’re covering the California primary live over here.

Find statewide results here.

And here’s everything you need to know about the election. 

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Gubernatorial candidate Antonio Villaraigosa put on an apron and served customers Monday while campaigning at Dulan's Soul Food on Crenshaw.
Gubernatorial candidate Antonio Villaraigosa put on an apron and served customers Monday while campaigning at Dulan's Soul Food on Crenshaw. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

Democrat Antonio Villaraigosa began his final campaign sprint on Monday shaking hands with Bay Area commuters streaming on and off BART trains before flying south and heading to San Pedro.

Villaraigosa visited the Port of Los Angeles for a tour of the AltaSea marine research center. The trip also provided the candidate with a picturesque backdrop for a series of local and national television interviews in the final push of his campaign for California governor.

Villaraigosa was quick to take a shot at Republican John Cox for having the support of President Trump, who remains unpopular in California along with his policies on immigration and healthcare. Recent polls show Cox is in second place behind Democratic front-runner Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom and is the candidate Villaraigosa needs to beat on Tuesday to advance to the November election.

  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
GOP gubernatorial candidate John Cox and his wife, Sarah, turn in their ballots after voting at the San Diego Registrar of Voters on Monday.
GOP gubernatorial candidate John Cox and his wife, Sarah, turn in their ballots after voting at the San Diego Registrar of Voters on Monday. (K.C. Alfred / San Diego Union-Tribune)

Republican candidate for governor John Cox expressed confidence that he would place in the top two in Tuesday’s primary and face off against Democratic front-runner Gavin Newsom in November.

“I’m energized and if the polls are right, I’m going to get the chance to make my case to the voters that Gavin Newsom is going to raise your taxes,” Cox said in an interview after greeting GOP voters at a luncheon in San Diego. “He’s going to raise your property taxes, double the state income tax, he’s going to defend the regressive, horrible gas tax that impacts the working people of this state and drives up gasoline costs, and he’s going to have to defend the mismanagement of the state.”

Cox also voted Monday and planned to visit a phone bank in Corona with Assembly candidate Bill Essayli, who is running for the 60th Assembly District.

  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats
Gavin Newsom with his wife Jennifer Siebel Newsom, right, greet Andre Truth, left, and Zhani Jackson at The Serving Spoon in Inglewood.
Gavin Newsom with his wife Jennifer Siebel Newsom, right, greet Andre Truth, left, and Zhani Jackson at The Serving Spoon in Inglewood. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Gubernatorial front-runner Gavin Newsom said he felt confident about his chances in Tuesday’s primary election, but was taking nothing for granted as he greeted voters at a diner in Inglewood on Monday.

“I feel good,” the lieutenant governor told reporters at the Serving Spoon. “At this stage, it’s just about getting out the vote. … Polls don’t vote, people vote, and that means all this is academic until people get out there, send their ballots in, or show up on election day.”

The former San Francisco mayor kicked off the day with a television appearance in Los Angeles before heading to Inglewood with Los Angeles County Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas. The region’s voters are critical to the campaign of former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, and Newsom has spent considerable time here trying to edge his Democratic rival.

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The dome of the California Capitol in Sacramento is lighted up.
The dome of the California Capitol in Sacramento is lighted up. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

Just days after the chairwoman of California’s campaign watchdog agency abruptly quit, an internal power struggle came to a head Monday with its governing board restructuring itself to transfer powers from the chairperson to other members.

The remaining four members of the state Fair Political Practices Commission decided to shift some powers over budget, personnel, legal and policy matters from a full-time chair to the other four commissioners, who are part-time appointees and could meet behind closed doors as two-person committees to mull key issues.

Former Chairwoman Jodi Remke voiced concerns about the proposal last Friday as she resigned from her appointment, made by Gov. Jerry Brown.

  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, center left, and California Gov. Jerry Brown, center, at the Democratic National Convention in 2016.
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, center left, and California Gov. Jerry Brown, center, at the Democratic National Convention in 2016. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

While Democrats campaign down to the wire, hoping to ensure their candidates are not kept out of crucial House races by California’s top-two primary, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is thinking ahead as party leaders plot their path.

Pelosi and Gov. Jerry Brown will headline a high-dollar fundraiser in Beverly Hills on June 18, less than two weeks after Tuesday’s primary.

The event is being hosted by film mogul Jeffrey Katzenberg and his wife, Marilyn, at Spago — Wolfgang Puck’s flagship restaurant — and tickets are $25,000, according to an invitation obtained by The Times. Tickets for event co-chairs are going for $250,000, the invite says.

Antonio Villaraigosa, left, prays with the Rev. Johnteris Tate at Mt. Moriah Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Sunday.
Antonio Villaraigosa, left, prays with the Rev. Johnteris Tate at Mt. Moriah Baptist Church in Los Angeles on Sunday. (Kent Nishimura)

As he waited in the wings to take the stage at Gardena’s City of Refuge church, Democrat Antonio Villaraigosa started swinging his hips and grooving in place as the choir belted out an extended version of the gospel song “He Got Up.”

The cavernous sanctuary was his last stop in a morning full of visits to African American churches in the Los Angeles area Sunday on the final weekend before election day. His top rival in the race for California governor, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, was hopscotching from church to church in the city as well.

Villaraigosa apologized from the pulpit for his short visit, blaming it on the whirlwind campaign season. He reminded churchgoers that he wasn’t a newcomer.

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  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats
Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom campaigns at Greater Zion Church Family church in Compton on Sunday.
Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom campaigns at Greater Zion Church Family church in Compton on Sunday. (Jay Clendenin/Los Angeles Times)

Gubernatorial front-runner Gavin Newsom visited African American churches Sunday morning, greeting worshipers, clapping along as gospel choirs sang and invoking Martin Luther King Jr. as he spoke of the economic divide in California.

“The Bible teaches us many things, but nothing more important to me than this: The Bible teaches us we are many parts but one body, and when one part suffers, we all suffer,” Newsom told worshipers at the Greater Zion Church Family in Compton, drawing shouts of “Amen!” from the pews.

The lieutenant governor noted that eight million Californians, including two million children, live beneath the poverty line. 

  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Democrats
Antonio Villaraigosa, the former mayor of Los Angeles, speaks with students from Hayward's Tennyson High School in San Francisco.
Antonio Villaraigosa, the former mayor of Los Angeles, speaks with students from Hayward's Tennyson High School in San Francisco. (Marcio Jose Sanchez / Associated Press)

Wealthy supporters of Antonio Villaraigosa reported Saturday spending an additional $1.7 million to oppose Gavin Newsom, bringing their total efforts against the Democratic front-runner to more than $4 million in less than one week, according to campaign finance reports filed with the state.

The money was spent by the independent political committee called Families & Teachers for Antonio Villaraigosa for Governor 2018, funded largely by more than a dozen billionaires and multimillionaires who back charter schools and oppose the agenda of teachers unions. In all, the group has raised roughly $23 million.

The bulk of the money — $16.5 million — was initially spent promoting Villaraigosa’s candidacy. The committee also spent $1.9 million opposing Republican candidate John Cox, whom Villaraigosa is battling for second place in the June 5 top-two primary, and $241,000 to support Republican Travis Allen, part of an effort to divide the GOP vote and boost Villaraigosa’s chances of advancing to the November runoff.