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554 posts
  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election

California gubernatorial candidates Gavin Newsom and John Cox outlined sharp contrasts on how to resolve the state’s housing affordability crisis during a radio debate Monday morning.

While they agreed the state needs to speed production to address the state’s low housing supply, they differed on how to do that.

Newsom, the Democratic lieutenant governor, said the state needed to increase spending to help build new low-income housing developments, and pitched giving cities and counties more financial incentives to approve new housing. Currently, the state’s tax structure provides more revenue to local governments that approve commercial and hotel projects compared with housing. Newsom said he’d be willing to reexamine Proposition 13’s property tax restrictions as part of broad changes to the tax structure.

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John Cox, center, is questioned by reporters as he leaves a June news conference where he blasted a recent gas tax increase.
John Cox, center, is questioned by reporters as he leaves a June news conference where he blasted a recent gas tax increase. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

In a debate between California’s gubernatorial candidate Monday morning, KQED senior politics editor Scott Shafer asked Republican John Cox about past statements on the LGBTQ community, honing in on comments the Rancho Santa Fe businessman has made about gay marriage.

Cox has been criticized by his opponents for a series of gaffes and offensive statements. Read more in Phil Willon’s story.

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Democrat Gavin Newsom and Republican John Cox
Democrat Gavin Newsom and Republican John Cox (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)
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Some other year, under some other president, Republican Young Kim might have been a shoo-in to represent a majority-minority congressional district containing pieces of Orange, Los Angeles and San Bernardino counties.

  • Congressional races

“I think you guys know I’m running in the 48th District against Dana Russiabacher, I mean Dana Rohrabacher.”

  • State government
Priya Mathur, president of the CalPERS board of administration, lost her reelection bid.
Priya Mathur, president of the CalPERS board of administration, lost her reelection bid. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

The president of the board of administration of CalPERS, the state’s largest public employee pension fund, lost her bid for reelection to a Corona police officer, the agency announced Thursday after tallying votes from members cast over the last two months.

Priya Mathur, who has served on the board of the California Public Employees’ Retirement System since 2003, will be replaced by Jason Perez, a police sergeant who serves as president of the Corona Police Officers Assn. Mathur was selected in January as president of the CalPERS board, and her defeat marks the second shake-up of the pension fund’s leadership in less than a year.

Perez focused his campaign squarely on Mathur’s record representing public agency workers and on what he argues is a record by the pension fund of being overly focused on the political implications of its investments.

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Former Vice President Joe Biden will take the stage Thursday at a rally for five of the California Democrats battling to capture U.S. House seats held by Republicans. The rally at Cal State Fullerton comes in a year when California, and especially Orange County, is one of the main battlegrounds in Democrats’ campaign to seize control of the House.

  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine) leaves court in September. He and his wife pleaded not guilty to charges of misusing campaign funds.
Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine) leaves court in September. He and his wife pleaded not guilty to charges of misusing campaign funds. (Gregory Bull / Associated Press)

Seventy current or former national security and foreign policy officials have signed a letter condemning a campaign ad by Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-Alpine) that attempts to link his Democratic opponent to radical Islamists.

Hunter, who has been charged with misusing campaign funds, is facing a stiff challenge from 29-year-old Democrat Ammar Campa-Najjar in the 50th Congressional District. Although Campa-Najjar is Christian, Hunter has sought to tie him to radical Islam.

Hunter has repeatedly mentioned Campa-Najjar’s paternal grandfather, a member of the terrorist group that killed 11 Israeli athletes and coaches at the 1972 Munich Olympics. Campa-Najjar has condemned his grandfather’s actions and pointed out that he was born 16 years after his grandfather was killed by Israeli commandos in 1973.