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(Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images)

Sen. Dianne Feinstein leads fellow Democrat and state Sen. Kevin de León by 46% to 24% among likely voters in the race for the seat she’s held since 1992, according to a new poll by the Public Policy Institute of California.

Just 9% of likely voters reported being undecided, leaving De León with little room to close the gap in the roughly 100 days left until the election.

The poll found that 47% of Republicans and 24% of independents say they don’t plan to vote in the Senate race at all.

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Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox, left, and Democratic rival Gavin Newsom.
Republican gubernatorial candidate John Cox, left, and Democratic rival Gavin Newsom. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times; Justin Sullivan / Getty Images)

Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom has a dominant lead over the wealthy Rancho Santa Fe businessman John Cox in the race for California governor, according to a new poll by the Public Policy Institute of California.

Opportunities for Cox to pick up support before the November election also appear to be limited, with just 9% of likely voters saying they were undecided.

“The electorate is very polarized today. For Republicans it’s hard to imagine voting for a Democrat. For Democrats, it’s hard to imagine voting for a Republican,” institute President Mark Baldassare said.

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  • Ballot measures
Former Rep. Doug Ose, left, has submitted a proposed ballot measure specifying that only U.S. citizens can vote in local or state elections.
Former Rep. Doug Ose, left, has submitted a proposed ballot measure specifying that only U.S. citizens can vote in local or state elections. (Steve Yeater / Associated Press)

In the wake of San Francisco’s decision to remove citizenship status as a requirement for those voting in school board elections, a former Sacramento congressman said on Wednesday that he’ll work to change state law to block such efforts.

Doug Ose, a Republican who served in the House of Representatives from 1999 to 2005, submitted a proposed ballot measure to state officials that would ban voting by those in the U.S. illegally.

“It’s very simple. I don’t think noncitizens should be voting,” Ose said.

  • 2018 election

The Los Angeles Times inadvertently published embargoed poll results. Please return at 9 p.m. to see this article.

(Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times)

California’s top climate regulator will continue serving through 2020 under a plan set to be voted on Thursday.

Mary Nichols, who has led the California Air Resources Board since 2007, would see her term expire at the end of 2020 if the board’s members confirm staff recommendations at the Thursday meeting. The Air Resources Board is one of the most powerful agencies in the state, and is responsible for implementing California’s strict greenhouse gas and air pollution rules.

Legislation passed in 2016 authorizes Air Resources Board members to serve six-year terms, part of an effort by lawmakers to wrest some control over the agency from the governor, who appoints a dozen of the board’s 14 members. The new law, however, allowed initial terms in office to be staggered so that the board wouldn’t see constant turnover.

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David Hadley, seen here greeting voters after a 2016 Assembly candidates' forum, was appointed vice chairman of the state Republican Party.
David Hadley, seen here greeting voters after a 2016 Assembly candidates' forum, was appointed vice chairman of the state Republican Party. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

Former legislator David Hadley was unanimously appointed vice chairman of the California Republican Party on Tuesday by its board of directors. The move eases the path for the Manhattan Beach resident to become the party’s next leader once current Chairman Jim Brulte’s term ends in February.

Hadley, who ran for governor earlier this year before dropping out of the race after two weeks, served one term in the state Assembly representing much of the South Bay.

The 53-year-old businessman is a social moderate and fiscal conservative who has ties to prominent donors, relationships that could prove vital if next year’s chairman’s race is contested, and should he be elected leader of the state party.

  • 2018 election
(Geraldine Wilkins / Los Angeles Times)

California lawmakers decided last month to ask voters to consider permanent daylight saving time, but a handful of prominent Democratic lawmakers are continuing their disagreement over the plan’s merits in the pages of November’s election guide.

Proposition 7 would allow the Legislature — if Congress approves — to abolish the twice-yearly changing of clocks, and instead permanently place the state on daylight saving time. It would undo provisions of a 1949 ballot measure that first created the shifting of official time by one hour every spring, thus allowing lawmakers to enact year-round daylight saving time as long as it’s consistent with federal law.

Although Proposition 7 won a spot on the ballot with bipartisan support in the state Capitol, not all lawmakers think voters should embrace it.

Auditors released this photo of the Tiki bar they say was built near a Cal Fire official's home.
Auditors released this photo of the Tiki bar they say was built near a Cal Fire official's home. (California State Auditor via www.tikiwithray.com)

An assistant chief of the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection asked employees to help build a Tiki bar behind the house he rented from the state government, according to a state audit released on Tuesday.

The high-ranking fire official “misused state employees and caused discredit” to the agency by quietly building the bar, complete with electricity and plumbing, over six months in 2016.

“The assistant chief misused state land when he built an unauthorized structure in the backyard of the home he rented from CAL FIRE,” auditors wrote. “The rental agreement states that the tenant agrees to obtain written consent from the CAL FIRE unit before making any significant improvements or changes to the site.”

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Rep. Barbara Lee will seek to lead the Democratic Caucus next year, making her the second Californian to enter the race.

  • State government
  • California Legislature
The California Assembly
The California Assembly (Steve Yeater / Associated Press)

A plan to replace California’s antiquated website for disclosing lobbying activity and contributions to elected officials is 11 months behind schedule, and its budget has doubled.

Secretary of State Alex Padilla notified the Legislature last week that the replacement for the Cal-ACCESS system will be delayed until the end of 2019. It had been scheduled for completion in February. 

The Legislature agreed two years ago to a plan that would cost $11.6 million, but as the project has proceeded and vendors were consulted, lawmakers have repeatedly upped the budget. It now stands at $23 million.