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298 posts
  • State government
The dome of the California Capitol in Sacramento is lighted up.
The dome of the California Capitol in Sacramento is lighted up. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

For the second time in a month, a member of the state’s campaign finance watchdog agency has resigned, officials said Monday.

Commissioner Maria Audero, a Los Angeles attorney, said in a letter submitted to the governor on Friday that she was quitting the state Fair Political Practices Commission before her term ends to accept an appointment as a U.S. magistrate judge.

“Though it saddens me that this appointment precludes me from completing my term as commissioner, I look forward to this new path of public service,” Audero said in a letter three years after her appointment.

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  • U.S. Senate race
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The Los Angeles County elections chief said Friday that he was seeking an independent review after more than 118,000 people were left off voter rosters this week.

  • Politics podcast

On this week’s episode of the California Politics Podcast, we dive deep into the results from last week’s biggest statewide races.

The race for governor and U.S. Senate offered fascinating glimpses into the impact of the state’s top-two primary system. And now, the stage is set for one-on-one showdowns in November for these races and a handful of key contests for the House of Representatives.

  • California Democrats
Lindsey Buckingham will perform at a meet-and-greet fundraiser for Democratic congressional hopefuls.
Lindsey Buckingham will perform at a meet-and-greet fundraiser for Democratic congressional hopefuls. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

A star-studded fundraiser for Democratic candidates in key House races is scheduled for next month.

Former Fleetwood Mac lead guitarist Lindsey Buckingham will perform at the Los Angeles home of California Coastal Commissioner Chair Dayna Bochco on July 31. 

The event’s co-hosts include directors Cameron Crowe and Callie Khouri, affordable housing developer Tom Safran, producers Doug Wick and Bill Mechanic and “Game of Thrones” co-creator David Benioff.

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Assemblywoman Sydney Kamlager-Dove prepares for the oath of office from Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon with her husband, Austin Dove.
Assemblywoman Sydney Kamlager-Dove prepares for the oath of office from Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon with her husband, Austin Dove. (California Assembly Democrats)

The Clippers are again asking state lawmakers to help them speed up construction of the team’s proposed arena in Inglewood.

Assemblywoman Sydney Kamlager-Dove (D-Los Angeles), whose district includes Inglewood, introduced new legislation that would provide shortcuts for approval should the arena proposal face challenges under California’s primary environmental law governing development.

The bill would encourage judges to decide any lawsuit under the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA, within nine months and prohibit a judge from stopping construction on the arena unless there were imminent life and safety risks.

  • 2018 election
Gavin Newsom (left), John Cox
Gavin Newsom (left), John Cox (File photos)

The results of California’s gubernatorial primary means the state’s next governor has big promises to fulfill on housing affordability.

Democratic Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom has set a goal for developers to build 500,000 new homes annually for the next seven years — a number the state has never reached since the building industry began keeping statistics in the mid-1950s. Not to be outdone, Republican businessman John Cox wants 300,000 new homes built every year, a level of production that far outpaces the state’s current rate. Both agree that the state needs a lot of new homes to keep pace with soaring demand.

On this episode of Gimme Shelter: The California Housing Crisis Pod, we talk about the differences between Newsom and Cox’s housing plans and round up action in the Legislature on key housing production and tenant bills. 

  • 2018 election
Mary Gonzales Gomez at her home, the campaign base of the Kings County Latino Roundtable.
Mary Gonzales Gomez at her home, the campaign base of the Kings County Latino Roundtable. (Jazmine Ulloa / Los Angeles Times)

In a city most known for its prison and farmland, the modest, one-story home of Mary and Raul Gomez has the feel of the quintessential American dream with its trimmed green lawn, little porch and white picket fence. In the driveway, there’s even a remodeled 1968 black Chevrolet Biscayne visible from Dairy Avenue.

For 20 years, it also has served to foster a truly American value — the civic duty of voting — as the campaign headquarters for the Kings County Latino Roundtable. There, in a shaded backyard decked with Oakland Raiders memorabilia, members meet over hot dogs and cold beverages to strategize voter canvassing routes, host candidate meet-and-greets and craft their trusted election guide — logistics for the crucial task of getting Latinos to cast ballots.

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  • California Democrats
Eleni Kounalakis, the U.S. ambassador to Hungary under President Obama, secured the top spot in the lieutenant governor race on Tuesday.
Eleni Kounalakis, the U.S. ambassador to Hungary under President Obama, secured the top spot in the lieutenant governor race on Tuesday. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

Three candidates who formerly worked for President Obama advanced in California’s primary election Tuesday.

Obama administration alumni rallied to help their former colleagues in a number of races across the country. Seven such candidates were on the California ballot. Three prevailed.

Democratic fundraiser Eleni Kounalakis, who served as U.S. ambassador to Hungary, finished first in the contest for lieutenant governor with 23% of the vote. Bay Area attorney Jeff Bleich, who was the U.S. ambassador to Australia, was fourth with 9% pending the final count of mail-in ballots and won’t advance to the November general election.

  • California Legislature
One option the A's are considering for a new stadium is redeveloping the site of their current home, Oakland Coliseum.
One option the A's are considering for a new stadium is redeveloping the site of their current home, Oakland Coliseum. (D. Ross Cameron / Associated Press)

A proposed new ballpark for the Oakland A’s would have an easier path to construction through new legislation introduced this week.

Assembly Bill 734 from Assemblyman Rob Bonta (D-Alameda) would provide shortcuts to approval should the ballpark proposal face challenges under California’s primary environmental law governing development. The bill would encourage judges to decide any lawsuit under the California Environmental Quality Act, or CEQA, within nine months and prohibit a judge from stopping construction on the ballpark unless there were imminent life and safety risks.

“It’s a great project that will create good jobs and benefit the city of Oakland,” Bonta said.