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Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in Los Angeles make an arrest in February.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in Los Angeles make an arrest in February. (Charles Reed / Associated Press)

Adopting another measure to counter the Trump administration, the California Senate on Thursday sent Gov. Jerry Brown a bill that would bar the disclosure of the immigration status of alleged crime victims and witnesses in open court unless a judge rules the information is relevant to the case.

Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) introduced the bill after the state’s top judge expressed concerns over reports of immigration agents following immigrants in California courthouses. The efforts were seen as part of President Trump’s call for increased enforcement by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

“Currently we know that ICE is in our courthouses,” Wiener told his colleagues before the vote. “We also know that there are situations where attorneys will ask witnesses on the stand about their immigration status whether or not it’s relevant to the case.”

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  • Governor's race
  • 2018 election
  • California Republicans
  • California Democrats
Republican candidate John Cox speaks to delegates at the state GOP convention Saturday in San Diego.
Republican candidate John Cox speaks to delegates at the state GOP convention Saturday in San Diego. (Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times)

Allies of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Antonio Villaraigosa are targeting Republican rival John Cox with a television ad and mailers that paint him as a carpetbagger from Chicago who is not truly conservative and has a history of losing campaigns.

On Wednesday, a group funded by wealthy charter school backers began airing a 30-second television ad that features a man wondering who could beat Democratic front-runner Gavin Newsom in the governor’s race. The man quickly dispenses with Assemblyman Travis Allen, another Republican in the race, before turning to Cox.

“What’s he done?” the man asks, as the ad shows a Google search of Cox. “A Chicago lawyer? Huh?”

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George Deukmejian was a role model for the type of officeholder we desperately need in today’s hyperventilated, polarized politics.

Ingrid Lopez rallies fellow students at the National School Walkout for Gun Control, at Miguel Contreras Learning Complex in Los Angeles.
Ingrid Lopez rallies fellow students at the National School Walkout for Gun Control, at Miguel Contreras Learning Complex in Los Angeles. (Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

California’s teachers’ retirement system will pressure retail companies it invests in to stop selling firearms and parts that are outlawed by the state, and would consider divestment from firms that refuse to make changes, a key panel decided Wednesday.

The vote by the Investment Committee for the California State Teachers’ Retirement System was supported by state Treasurer John Chiang, an ex officio member of the panel. It comes many months after he had asked in October that the system take more immediate action to stop investing in the gun retailers.

“If Congress and State Houses are either unwilling or unable to pass sensible policies to stop our schoolyards, work sites and places of worship from becoming killing fields, then let’s take the battle to where the money is,” Chiang, a candidate for governor, told the Investment Committee before the unanimous vote to adopt the engagement policy. On the debate stage Tuesday night, Chiang let voters know about the expected action coming from CalSTRS.

A bipartisan group of House members led by California’s Jeff Denham filed a petition Wednesday to force a vote on four immigration bills over the objections of Republican leadership.

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Californians may only now be realizing there’s an election for governor in four weeks, but the men and women seeking the job have been on the campaign trail for a long time.

(Aric Crabb / Bay Area News Group)

California's six leading candidates for governor discussed topics ranging from immigration to artificial intelligence over the course of a 90-minute debate Tuesday night. Some produced thoughtful answers about the state’s future, others generated responses that came across as general bromides about making things better.

And interspersed were a few key moments that offered a glimpse into where this race stands, now four weeks from election day.

Personalities, not policies, seemed to divide (most of) the candidates. Going into the debate, a key question was whether voters would see variety in the strains of Democratic or Republican politics to offer voters. That’s an especially important point in the era of the top-two primary, where voters can choose a candidate regardless of party.

  • Governor's race

The debate among the candidates vying to be California’s next governor lasted 90 minutes. With rapid-fire questions and six candidates on stage, there was little time for anyone to waste.

Debate moderator Chuck Todd, who closed the forum by noting things had remained civil and on topic, kept the clock moving and each candidate had an opportunity to field multiple questions. Even the longshots. 

Consider that Assemblyman Travis Allen, who is in the back of the pack when it comes to polling and fundraising, actually had the most air time. 

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Gubernatorial candidate John Cox
Gubernatorial candidate John Cox (Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times)

At Tuesday night’s gubernatorial debate, GOP businessman John Cox said he led the recall effort against former San Diego Mayor Bob Filner, who resigned in 2013 under a torrent of sexual harassment allegations.

Cox was a donor to the effort to oust Filner, but he was not one of the primary driving forces behind Filner’s exit. A former San Diego city councilwoman as well as two local attorneys first called on Filner to resign and were the most prominent opponents of Filner as the controversy raged.

John Myers and Melanie Mason will be with me in this live chat over here as we watch the debate and provide real-time commentary and analysis.

And for more coverage like that, make sure to sign up for our free Essential Politics newsletter.