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Gavin Newsom speaks during a bus tour kickoff outside San Francisco City Hall on Tuesday.
Gavin Newsom speaks during a bus tour kickoff outside San Francisco City Hall on Tuesday. (Eric Risberg/Associated Press)

Kicking off a week-long bus tour in the run-up to election day, Gavin Newsom cast the stakes of the upcoming election in national — even international — terms.

“It’s not an exaggeration to say not just the country but the world is looking to all of you at this moment, the next seven days, to step up and to step in and to send a message and repudiate this moment,” Newsom told a crowd of supporters at San Francisco City Hall on Tuesday. “Because we are better than Washington, D.C. We’re better than Trump and Trumpism. We’re better than the rhetoric and the reality of the last 72 hours.”

The Democratic lieutenant governor spent less time touting his own candidacy for governor than taking jabs at President Trump and urging get-out-the-vote efforts for Democratic congressional candidates.

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Carl DeMaio, the chairman of the Proposition 6 campaign, left, and Republican attorney general candidate Steven Bailey.
Carl DeMaio, the chairman of the Proposition 6 campaign, left, and Republican attorney general candidate Steven Bailey. (Patrick McGreevy /Los Angeles Times)

Proposition 6 campaign leader Carl DeMaio on Monday threatened a recall campaign against state Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra for providing what he said was a misleading ballot title for the measure that would repeal increases in the gas tax and vehicle fees.

DeMaio said he filed papers Monday with the Secretary of State’s Office to form a campaign committee for a possible Becerra recall effort. He estimated that it would cost about $1 million to collect the 856,335 signatures needed to put a recall on the ballot.

“These politicians have stolen our gas tax money and now they are trying to steal our ‘yes’ vote on Prop. 6 and turn it into a ‘no’ vote, and for that there must be a punishment that is extracted,” DeMaio said during a press conference on the steps of the state Capitol building. “We intend to recall the attorney general, Xavier Becerra, over his attempt to defraud the voters of their ‘yes’ vote on Prop. 6.”

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If making it to the polls on Nov. 6 will be a challenge — or if you’re eager to cast your vote — you can go to a number of of early voting locations around Southern California.

  • Governor's race
Either Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, left, a Democrat, or businessman John Cox, right, a Republican, will be California's next governor.
Either Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, left, a Democrat, or businessman John Cox, right, a Republican, will be California's next governor. (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

Democratic Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom heads into the final days of California’s race for governor having outspent Republican John Cox by a more than a 2-to-1 margin this year.

That gap will likely grow even wider before the Nov. 6 election. The Newsom campaign still had $15.3 million cash on hand as of Oct. 20 compared with the $569,000 in Cox’s campaign account, according to finance reports filed with the state Thursday evening.

Along with Newsom’s significant edge in fundraising, the two-term lieutenant governor has had a solid lead in the most recent opinion polls.

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California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra
California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

California will not implement its new net neutrality law as scheduled on Jan. 1, Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra said Friday.

The state agreed to pause implementation of the landmark law pending the outcome of a federal court case challenging the Trump administration’s rollback of net neutrality rules. 

In a statement, Becerra said the decision was “intended to put us in the best position to preserve net neutrality for the 40 million people of our state. We are fighting the Trump Administration’s attempt to repeal net neutrality in the D.C. Circuit Court and we will vigorously defend California’s own net neutrality law."

The crowd outside campaign headquarters was boiling, the angry mood matching south Florida’s tropical heat, as Nancy Pelosi arrived to a shower of obscenities and crude insults in English and Spanish.

  • Congressional races
  • 2018 election
Democrat Katie Hill, running against Rep. Steve Knight (R-Palmdale) at a candidate forum in Lancaster.
Democrat Katie Hill, running against Rep. Steve Knight (R-Palmdale) at a candidate forum in Lancaster. (Gary Coronado / Los Angeles Times)

A lot can happen in 17 days.

Take the latest federal campaign finance reporting period, which ran from Oct. 1 to 17, the last snapshot we’ll get of California House candidates’ financial positions before election day.

In that time, Democrat Katie Hill spent just under $2 million on her campaign in the 25th Congressional District, about as much as GOP incumbent Steve Knight of Palmdale has spent in the entire two-year cycle.

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  • California Legislature
  • Sexual harassment
Pamela Lopez, at a December 2017 news conference, accused then-Assemblyman Matt Dababneh (D-Woodland Hills) of lewd behavior.
Pamela Lopez, at a December 2017 news conference, accused then-Assemblyman Matt Dababneh (D-Woodland Hills) of lewd behavior. (Rich Pedroncelli/AP)

A Sacramento lobbyist who was sued by former San Fernando Valley Assemblyman Matt Dababneh for defamation after she publicly accused him of sexual misconduct is seeking dismissal of the lawsuit.

Pamela Lopez announced on Thursday that she is filing a motion under California’s “anti-SLAPP” law, or “strategic lawsuit against public participation,” which protects a person exercising the right to free speech about an issue of public interest against being silenced through a lawsuit. 

The action marks the latest development in the saga between Lopez and Dababneh, who resigned in December, one week after Lopez publicly accused him of forcing her into a bathroom in a Las Vegas hotel suite and masturbating in front of her.

  • Ballot measures
  • 2018 election
An apartment complex in Reseda in October.
An apartment complex in Reseda in October. (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

An initiative to expand rent control across California is losing ground and now faces a large deficit less than two weeks before election day, according to a new poll.

Just 25% of likely voters say they’ll vote yes on Proposition 10, with 60% against the measure and 15% undecided, a poll released Wednesday from the nonpartisan Public Policy Institute of California said.

“There is really no group in which we’re seeing support for Proposition 10 at this point,” said Mark Baldassare, the institute’s president and pollster.