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Jesse Hughes of Eagles of Death Metal.
Jesse Hughes of Eagles of Death Metal. (Barry Brecheisen / Associated Press)

Eagles of Death Metal frontman Jesse Hughes has issued a video apology for the inflammatory statements he made in the wake of the March for Our Lives protests a little more than a week ago, saying he “was not attempting to impugn the youth  of America or this beautiful thing they've accomplished.”

Hughes has a unique role in the gun-control debate as a supporter of gun rights who was also one of the victims of the November 2015 terror attack at the Bataclan theater in Paris, where 89 people died. His posts garnered significant media coverage. 

“What I had intended to be a statement about the hijacking by any side of the aisle of the beautiful agenda of a movement of our nation's youth came off seeming like a mean-spirited personal attack and slight of the youth themselves, and even a personal attack of its leadership,” Hughes said in the Sunday video.

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  • Music
Beach Boys founding members Brian Wilson, left, and Al Jardine are to reteam for a 12-stop tour spotlighting Christmas music.
Beach Boys founding members Brian Wilson, left, and Al Jardine are to reteam for a 12-stop tour spotlighting Christmas music. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

Having performed the classic Beach Boys albums “Pet Sounds” and “Smile” in their entirety on separate tours in recent years, Brian Wilson is planning to bring the group’s beloved Christmas recordings to life during a limited tour timed for the holidays.

Announced Monday, “Brian Wilson Presents: The Christmas Album Live” tour is scheduled to launch Nov. 28 in Minneapolis and include stops in a dozen cities, including a Dec. 20 show at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza, the closest venue to Los Angeles at this point.

Wilson is to be joined by another founding member of the Beach Boys, singer-guitarist-songwriter Al Jardine, and latter-day band member Blondie Chaplin. Both have been on tour with him in recent years.

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  • TV
  • Music

Acclaimed rapper Jay-Z is up next on David Letterman’s Netflix talk show “My Next Guest Needs No Introduction,” and it looks like he’ll be breaking down what makes a good rapper.

In a short preview clip released by the streaming giant on Monday, the Grammy winner sits down with “The Late Show” veteran and gives shout-outs to his contemporaries, praising rapper Snoop Dogg’s voice and Eminem’s cadence.

“There’s multiple ways to be good,” he explains to Letterman. “Some people just have it all.”

  • Celebrity
Frank Stallone has walked back his disparaging remarks about teen activist David Hogg.
Frank Stallone has walked back his disparaging remarks about teen activist David Hogg. (Jesse Grant / Getty Images)

Frank Stallone apologized to David Hogg over the weekend for a since-deleted tweet slamming the teen gun-control activist for being “too big for his britches” and a “coward,” among other less savory terms. 

“To everyone and to David Hogg especially. I want to deeply apologize for my irresponsible words,” Sylvester Stallone’s younger brother wrote on Twitter on Sunday. “I would never in a million years wish or promote violence to anyone anywhere on this planet. After what these kids went though I’m deeply ashamed. Please accept my apology. Frank.”

The original tweet contained several NSFW words we’ve omitted here.

"Riverdale" was among 10 shows to get early pickups from the CW on Monday.
"Riverdale" was among 10 shows to get early pickups from the CW on Monday. (Katie Yu / the CW)

It’s a very happy Monday for nearly a dozen prime-time series on the CW after the network announced a batch of early renewals. 

“As The CW expands to a six-night, Sunday through Friday schedule next season, we are proud to have such a deep bench of great returning series for 2018-19,” Mark Pedowitz, president of the CW, said in a statement Monday.

“By picking these ten series up for next season, we have a terrific selection of programming to choose from when we set our fall schedule in May, with more still to come,” said Pedowitz.  “And I’m especially happy that we’ll continue to work with the incredibly talented casts, producers, and writers who create the series our fans are so passionate about.”

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  • Celebrity
Dwayne Johnson has spent several years sharing insight into his own experience with depression.
Dwayne Johnson has spent several years sharing insight into his own experience with depression. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times)

Though his exterior suggests he’s invincible, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson is not immune to the crushing weight of depression.

The “Rampage” star offered more insight into his own struggles with mental illness in a new interview with Express

“I reached a point where I didn’t want to do a thing or go anywhere,” Johnson told the British outlet, referring to a stint when he was a teenager. “I was crying constantly.”

Blac Chyna at the BET Hip Hop Awards in October 2017.
Blac Chyna at the BET Hip Hop Awards in October 2017. (Bennett Raglin / Getty Images)

Blac Chyna is one hot mama, at least when it comes to taking care of her baby girl. 

Then she’s flat-out on fire. 

Chyna was caught on video Sunday at Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia, removing her jacket and attempting to swing her pink plastic baby stroller after someone supposedly tried to touch Dream Kardashian, her child with ex-BF Rob Kardashian. 

"Last Week Tonight" host John Oliver devoted a segment of his HBO show on Sunday to Sinclair Broadcasting.
"Last Week Tonight" host John Oliver devoted a segment of his HBO show on Sunday to Sinclair Broadcasting. (Eric Liebowitz / HBO)

We have an idea what Jimmy Kimmel and Stephen Colbert will be talking about on their shows Monday night. 

Over the weekend, the late-night hosts were just two of the entertainment world figures tweeting about Deadspin’s video compilation of Sinclair Broadcasting anchors across the country reading an identical script warning against fake news.

The promo, which sounds the alarm on “biased and false news” by “some media outlets” outside the Sinclair orbit, is being referred to as a pro-Trump propaganda reel on Twitter, with some high-profile users calling for a boycott of the growing media company, which “either owns or operates” 173 local news stations, according to CNN’s Brian Stelter. Its deal to acquire more local stations from Tribune Media Co. is currently in the hands of the Federal Communications Commission. Deadspin’s video mash-up, which shows more than a dozen local Sinclair-station anchors simultaneously reciting the script, went viral after its release Saturday.

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  • Birthdays
(Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times)

I know I'm in a one-percentile position. I guess I've spent enough time in the wings to realize when I get a chance to work and do what I love doing that I want to make the ... most of it and not take it for granted.

James Faulkner as Paul, left, and Jim Caviezel as Luke in "Paul, Apostle of Christ."
James Faulkner as Paul, left, and Jim Caviezel as Luke in "Paul, Apostle of Christ." (Mark Cassar / Affirm Films / Sony Pictures Releasing)

Three faith-based films — “I Can Only Imagine,” “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” and “God’s Not Dead: A Light in Darkness” — are in theaters during Easter week. Two of the films,  “I Can Only Imagine”  and “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” are in the top 10 at the weekend box office. “God’s Not Dead: A Light in Darkness”  debuted at No. 12. Times film critic Justin Chang assesses the best and the worst of them. And from his perspective as a Christian moviegoer, he outlines his hope for a better 'faith-based' cinema.

AT ONE POINT in the hit musical biopic “I Can Only Imagine,” Bart Millard (J. Michael Finley), a Texan singer-songwriter touring with his up-and-coming Christian rock band MercyMe, receives a rude awakening from the industry he’s trying to woo. “You’re just not good enough,” says one record-label rep, inadvertently echoing the cruel words of Bart’s abusive father (Dennis Quaid) and triggering a wave of flashbacks to the boy’s traumatized upbringing.

Those flashbacks made me roll my eyes, but they also filled me with a strange sense of guilt. As someone who considers himself both a lover of cinema and a follower of Jesus Christ, I must confess that the words “You’re just not good enough” have generally summed up my own opinion of the many, many Christian-themed independent productions that have sprung up since the smash success of “The Passion of the Christ” 14 years ago.