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1293 posts
  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
  • Charter Schools
President Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos addressed parents and educators Tuesday.
President Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos addressed parents and educators Tuesday. (Alex Wong / Getty Images)

On the campaign trail, Donald Trump said little about education, but he did propose an expensive plan for expanding school vouchers, which allow public money to go toward tuition at private, often religious, schools.

Then he picked Betsy DeVos, a long-time voucher advocate, as his secretary of Education.

Since DeVos' confirmation, there has been a flurry of legislative activity around charter schools and vouchers in some states. 

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  • K-12
(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health is investigating the death Saturday of an 18-year-old Santa Monica High School student.

Kelly Cano, a senior, was a member of the school’s choir and swim team, according to a statement from the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District. She is the second student that the high school has lost this school year. Sophomore Vanai Jelks, 15, died in October.

The Los Angeles County coroner’s office has not determined a cause of death for either student, according to an email from coroner’s spokesman Craig Harvey.

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Senior Editor Antonio Mejias-Rentas, left, and student reporter Kimberly Gallardo, 16, of the Boyle Heights Beat newspaper interview a Los Angeles police sergeant.
Senior Editor Antonio Mejias-Rentas, left, and student reporter Kimberly Gallardo, 16, of the Boyle Heights Beat newspaper interview a Los Angeles police sergeant. (Patrick T. Fallon / Los Angeles Times)

This school year, Diego Flores joined the Boyle Heights Beat, a newspaper in which high school students write about the historic Latino neighborhood east of downtown. Their stories run in Spanish and English, online and in print.

It’s a small operation, run out of a donated space at an old hospital. But in the six years the Beat has been around, the paper has become a key voice for the community. The teenagers who run it have learned as much about themselves as they have about Boyle Heights. 

  • Higher Education
  • Community Colleges
A $25-million library opened on the Compton Community College campus in 2014 after a seven-year delay. Accreditation leaders said the new building was symbolic of the progress the school has made.
A $25-million library opened on the Compton Community College campus in 2014 after a seven-year delay. Accreditation leaders said the new building was symbolic of the progress the school has made. (Anne Cusack / Los Angeles Times)

The Compton Community College District, which has been managed by a state-appointed special trustee since it lost its accreditation more than a decade ago, has won back the authority to govern itself — a major nod to its efforts to rebuild, state officials announced Tuesday.

The college now will be run once again by its own elected board of trustees.

  • For Parents
The stars of YouTube Red's new family series "Hyperlinked."
The stars of YouTube Red's new family series "Hyperlinked." (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

YouTube, already one of the leading destinations for swipe-savvy kids, is launching its own slate of original TV shows aimed at children and families in the coming months.

The series will join the roster of original productions under the global streaming giant’s monthly subscription service, YouTube Red. The first batch of programming — four shows whose premieres will be spaced out — will start rolling out in April. 

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In and around Los Angeles: 

In California:

Nationwide: 

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
Alijah Haggins, 13, yells "hello" during a school-violence prevention program last week at Eagle Rock High School.
Alijah Haggins, 13, yells "hello" during a school-violence prevention program last week at Eagle Rock High School. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Add fighting bullying to the long list of priorities for which the nation’s second-largest school system has good intentions but sluggish follow-through.

One in 5 Los Angeles high school students and 1 in 4 elementary students said they had been bullied last school year, according to a survey conducted as part of a newly released internal audit.

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
Students at Eagle Rock High take part last week in an event aimed at reducing violence at schools.
Students at Eagle Rock High take part last week in an event aimed at reducing violence at schools. (Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times)

L.A. Unified could be doing more to prevent bullying, and that's according to the school district itself.

One in five high school students said they were bullied last year, as did one in four elementary students.

Officials might not know the full extent of the problem, because many schools apparently aren't tracking it.

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By now, you might have read about the U.S. Department of Education's weekend Twitter follies.

In a nutshell, the department tweeted a quote from NAACP co-founder W.E.B. Du Bois — but misspelled his name as DeBois. A few hours later came a corrected version, then an apology tweet, which, in its first iteration, offered "our deepest apologizes" instead of "apologies."

People were quick to point out the mistake because new U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos' answers at her confirmation hearing raised questions for many about whether she had the knowledge to do the job. And her tweets haven't been so perfect either.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
Protesters, including Ari Schwartz, center, gather outside Jefferson Academy in Washington, D.C., last week with messages for Education Secretary Betsy DeVos.
Protesters, including Ari Schwartz, center, gather outside Jefferson Academy in Washington, D.C., last week with messages for Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. (Maria Danilova / Associated Press)

The protester who was arrested Friday for blocking new U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos' entry into a Washington, D.C., public school pleaded not guilty to assault charges over the weekend.

The protester was Bilal Ahmed Askaryar, Politico first reported. Askaryar, 32, made his first appearance in D.C. Superior Court on Saturday, according to William Miller, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's Office.

Askaryar was charged with two misdemeanors counts of assaulting, resisting or interfering with a police officer and one misdemeanor count of failure to obey a lawful order.