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  • Higher Education
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(Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times)

California received flunking grades in a new report measuring the state's progress in enrolling high school graduates in college and helping them complete a certificate or degree program.

The analysis, released Thursday by the Campaign for College Opportunity, also gave the state a B- for preparing high school students for college-level courses, and a C for helping students and their families pay the cost of college.

The Los Angeles education nonprofit said California needs 1.7 million more adults with college credentials by 2025 to meet the state's workforce needs. To reach that goal, 60% of adults need to finish a college program — a four-year degree from the University of California or Cal State University or a certificate or two-year associate degree from the California Community Colleges.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
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Tents under the 101 Freeway near Echo Park
Tents under the 101 Freeway near Echo Park (Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

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Children in Glendale's summer lunch program in 2015.
Children in Glendale's summer lunch program in 2015. (Raul Roa / Glendale News-Press)

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LAUSD board member-elect Nick Melvoin
LAUSD board member-elect Nick Melvoin (Brian van der Brug / Los Angeles Times)

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(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Charter school backers put a lot of money behind candidates in this month’s Los Angeles school board elections.

Now the seven-member board is about to have its first pro-charter majority.

Charter schools are publicly funded, privately run schools that are exempt from some of the rules that govern traditional public schools. In Los Angeles, they are mostly run by nonprofits, with a staff that is not unionized.

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(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

The paintings have been removed from the walls and the desktop photos have been wrapped and put away. Strewn around the room, odds and ends await boxing: a gong and assorted piles of books. After 29 years, Steven Lavine, the third president of the California Institute of the Arts, is retiring. This month, he attended his last CalArts graduation.

“After handing out degrees for 28 years,” he says with wistful smile, “I was given an honorary degree as well.”

Over the course of his long tenure, Lavine has faced triumph and devastation.

  • K-12

Park rangers for the Santa Monica Mountains are on the hunt for a “promposal” vandal, who scrawled a prom invitation on a rock near Sandstone Peak — the second year in a row the same message has appeared there.

Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area officials took to Twitter and Facebook on Thursday afternoon, sharing a picture of the rock with “Prom?” scrawled on it in white.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
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(Emily Kask / Hartford Courant)

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  • K-12

Two Savanna High School students were arrested Thursday on suspicion of plotting acts of violence at the Orange County campus, including placing bombs and committing shootings.

School administrators contacted Anaheim police early Thursday after learning of the threats posted online, police Sgt. Daron Wyatt said.

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A student walkout at Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts on Thursday.
A student walkout at Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts on Thursday. (Molly Kleinman)

Students at Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts walked out of classes today after one teenager accused another of rape. 

Some students and parents are concerned that they were not told anything about what allegedly happened. Some also were upset over what they saw as inaction on the part of the school district.  

The campus, on the north edge of downtown L.A., is the flagship arts high school for the Los Angeles Unified School District.