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1293 posts
  • Higher Education
  • California State University

When Jorge Reyes Salinas was 10, his parents cobbled together enough money to leave Peru to start a new life in Los Angeles. They wanted a better future for their only son, who thought he was going to Disneyland.

Reyes Salinas didn’t understand what his lack of legal status meant until, as a sophomore in high school, he was encouraged to enroll in advanced classes at a local community college. The forms asked for a Social Security number, which he did not have.

State support made it possible for him to attend the one university he applied to: Cal State Northridge. Because he couldn’t qualify for any federal financial aid, he went by bus to a machine shop after class each day and worked 30 to 40 hours a week.

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Marlborough School has reached a settlement with Chelsea Burkett, 33, who was impregnated by an English teacher when she was a student there.

Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Michael P. Linfield presided over the agreement, whose details have been sealed under a confidentiality clause.

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  • Higher Education
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(Grossmont Middle College High School)

Phillipa Villalobos, a senior at Grossmont Middle College High School, describes her experience taking college courses while in high school.

My teeth chattered as I reluctantly joined the crowd, desperately trying to read the buildings and find my class. My heart was waiting to stop at the ring of a bell that would inform me I was late, but a bell would never come. Although I was 16 and starting my junior year of high school, it was actually my first day of college.

The previous spring I had decided to apply to a Middle College program where 11th and 12th graders attend a community college to fulfill both high school and college credits simultaneously, with the exception of two mandatory high school classes that were held on the college campus and essentially the core of the program. The program has not only saved me money on AP and IB tests while offering college credit, but it has also served as a great transition to gain experience and confidence in college classes and communicating with college professors and staff.

  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times)

A small Hebrew-immersion charter school found out Tuesday that there were limits to how far it could push a new school board majority that is widely regarded as pro-charter.

But Lashon Academy Charter School’s challenge to the rules set by the Los Angeles Unified School District is widely seen as a sign of things to come.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

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Sandy Casey
Sandy Casey (Manhattan Beach Unified School District)

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  • Higher Education

Los Angeles police said they found no evidence of a shooting on the USC campus Monday after reports of gunfire prompted a lockdown and a huge LAPD response.

“No danger to community,” the LAPD said on Twitter after completing a search of campus buildings.

  • K-12
  • HS Insider
(Ethan Hirschberg / HS Insider)

Ethan Hirschberg, a sophomore at San Dieguito Academy, writes about his experience with autism.

Yesterday, I had a small panic attack.

I was so upset that my heart was racing. I realized that my second year of high school started in three short days. I have been keeping track of how long I have left in summer for a few weeks now, but this time the harsh reality sunk in.

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  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
  • University of California
With no running water, children bathe at a fire hydrant in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
With no running water, children bathe at a fire hydrant in San Juan, Puerto Rico. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

Desiree Felix didn’t make her way to UCLA with the help of helicopter parents who hired tutors, hounded teachers or edited her application essays.

Her father is a handyman with a sixth-grade education. Her mother finished high school and helps manage apartments.

In her freshman year, Felix has chosen to live on a newly created dorm floor just for students like her who are the first in their families to attend college.