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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
(Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

As uncertainty over President Trump’s immigration policies persists, attorneys at the UC Immigrant Legal Services Center have become academia’s go-to experts. Should students apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, and give their personal information to the Trump administration? Should they travel abroad and risk being denied reentry?

Can students rest easy with the recent news that U.S. immigration officials actually approved more DACA applications in the first three months of this year than in the same period last year?

The center’s attorneys wrestle with such questions daily — along with a soaring workload. Maria Blanco, an attorney who heads the University of California Immigrant Legal Services Center, estimates that cases totaled more than 800 for the 2016-17 academic year, compared with 362 last year. Most of them involve DACA applications, travel permissions, help for students’ families and general consultations.

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(Lynwood Unified School District)

By the time Elizabeth Valenzuela entered her senior year at Lynwood High School, she had taken seven Advanced Placement tests and earned potential college credit on five of them. It was an impressive accomplishment, made more impressive still by the fact that in her small school district she wasn’t one of a kind.

Increasing numbers of students from low-income Latino and black families are taking advanced courses and passing AP exams in Lynwood Unified School District, south of downtown Los Angeles.

To make this happen, the district of 15,000 students provided incentives and assistance and eliminated prerequisite courses and grade requirements that used to limit who enrolled.

(Lynwood Unified School District)

By the time Elizabeth Valenzuela entered her senior year at Lynwood High School, she had taken seven Advanced Placement tests and earned potential college credit on five of them. It was an impressive accomplishment, made more impressive still by the fact that in her small school district she wasn’t one of a kind.

Increasing numbers of students from low-income Latino and black families are taking advanced courses and passing AP exams in Lynwood Unified School District, south of downtown Los Angeles.

To make this happen, the district of 15,000 students provided incentives and assistance and eliminated prerequisite courses and grade requirements that used to limit who enrolled.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
Transgender student Gavin Grimm, whose case the Supreme Court recently vacated.
Transgender student Gavin Grimm, whose case the Supreme Court recently vacated. (Associated Press)

Shortly after President Donald Trump's inauguration, the administration made waves by revoking President Barack Obama's guidance for transgender students.

The Obama guidelines required schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms according to their stated gender identity, or provide them with private facilities.

At the time, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos said that such students do receive civil rights protections, and that her office would be releasing an update on how they could be implemented.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
Transgender student Gavin Grimm, whose case the Supreme Court recently vacated.
Transgender student Gavin Grimm, whose case the Supreme Court recently vacated. (Associated Press)

Shortly after President Donald Trump's inauguration, the administration made waves by revoking President Barack Obama's guidance for transgender students.

The Obama guidelines required schools to let transgender students use the bathrooms and locker rooms according to their stated gender identity, or provide them with private facilities.

At the time, Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos said that such students do receive civil rights protections, and that her office would be releasing an update on how they could be implemented.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
The state's new budget includes language that is friendly to unions.
The state's new budget includes language that is friendly to unions. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
The state's new budget includes language that is friendly to unions.
The state's new budget includes language that is friendly to unions. (Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
(Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

As Corinthian Colleges Inc., ITT Technical Institute and other for-profit schools collapsed in recent years, the Obama administration overhauled regulations to make it easier to forgive loans for stranded students and to try to prevent future abuses.

Now, the Trump administration is suspending those rules, which had been set to go into effect July 1. The Department of Education, under Secretary Betsy DeVos, also is launching an effort to rewrite the rules.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • K-12
(Erik Lesser / European Pressphoto Agency)

The U.S. Department of Education is telling civil rights investigators that they can limit the scope of their work, according to an internal memo uncovered by ProPublica. 

The department also is circulating an internal memo that applies similar standards to cases involving transgender students — and encourages case officers to assess each on its own. 

The memo regarding transgender students lists specific instances where officers could have "subject matter jurisdiction," such as failure to use a student's preferred pronoun or a school or district's failure to fix an environment that is hostile toward transgender students. Investigations into  transgender students  being denied the right to use the bathrooms of their choice is not on that list — and the memo states that based on jurisdiction, some complaints might go forward while others, involving bathrooms, might be dismissed.