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  • K-12
(Patrick T. Fallon / For The Times)

Nearly two months after a norovirus outbreak began during a class trip to Yosemite, students in Santa Monica are still falling sick with the stomach bug, according to school and public health officials.

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Brooklyn Avenue Elementary got a blue for math, despite having a negative "distance from 3" score.
Brooklyn Avenue Elementary got a blue for math, despite having a negative "distance from 3" score. (California Department of Education)

This week, the state launched the California School Dashboard, a new color-coded system for rating schools. 

As we reported, a Times analysis found that the state graded schools on a curve for academics. In recent testing, just half of students reached state benchmarks for math and English but the dashboard rates 80% of schools blue, green and yellow — the top three of five color rankings. 

That shift from half failing to most succeeding is partly because of the curve but also because the new ratings factor in how much progress schools make.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
Tom Torlakson
Tom Torlakson (Cheryl A. Guerrero / Los Angeles Times)

The day after President Trump unveiled a budget that would cut money from California's schools, state Supt. of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson promised to fight back.

“This proposal takes us backward, jeopardizing California’s progress," he said in a statement. Then, he listed how the budget could affect California's schools:

Torlakson is going to Washington, D.C., next week to lobby against the proposed changes.

Nunez shakes hands with junior Steven Wasserman during the lunch period.
Nunez shakes hands with junior Steven Wasserman during the lunch period. (Joey Safchik / HS Insider)

Ernesto Nunez, better known to the students and faculty at CHAMPS Charter High School as Ernie, is typically the first face students see when arriving at school each morning. He stands on Van Nuys Boulevard ushering student pedestrians and carpool drop-offs away from the bustling street.

With signature black sunglasses upon his bald head, he smiles and greets each and every student beginning nearly an hour before the warning bell rings.

“Hi, boy, have a good lunch … healthy, healthy,” Nunez says to a student as the upperclassman leaves campus for lunch.

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Marcio Jose Sanchez / Associated Press)

University of California regents expressed an array of concerns Thursday over a controversial proposal to limit the number of undergraduates from other states and countries to 20% of total systemwide enrollment.

The regents, meeting in San Francisco, unanimously approved Carol T. Christ, a longtime UC Berkeley administrator and professor, as the next chancellor to lead the renowned but troubled public research university.

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  • K-12
(Sara D. Davis / Getty Images)

I remember the trembling fear that engulfed my body. I would hold my pee for hours; I normalized lower belly pain because it was less uncomfortable than choosing a bathroom. It was a constant dance, one that consumed my mind and eclipsed my lessons: how to be able to pee, when to pee and where.

There was a boys’ bathroom on a lower floor, for second graders, that I figured was less risky than the fourth-grade one, because those kids wouldn’t know me, or think that I wasn’t supposed to be in there. I didn’t question why bathrooms were segregated, I just felt, in my tensed muscles, that being caught in the “wrong one” would be deeply shameful, humiliating, disgusting.

  • K-12
  • For Parents
(Carlos Chavez / Los Angeles Times)

Before using pesticides near California public schools, growers would have to notify school and county agricultural officials, under a revised draft regulation released Thursday — but the notification requirements would be less strenuous than what was proposed a few months ago.

In September, the California Department of Pesticide Regulation released a draft proposal that would ban crop dusting and many other forms of agricultural pesticide spraying within a quarter of a mile of public schools and day-care centers on weekdays between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m.

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
(Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
(Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

In California:

Nationwide:

  • LAUSD
  • Charter Schools
Arminta Street Elementary School parents protest.
Arminta Street Elementary School parents protest. (Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

Leaders of the union that represents most public school teachers in the Los Angeles Unified School District announced their support Thursday for a bill that would fundamentally change who has the power to open charter schools in California.

Senate Bill 808, introduced by Sen. Tony Mendoza (D-Artesia), sets the stage for another year of arguing over how to reshape the state’s charter school law.

If it were to be enacted, it would dismantle the system of appeals that allows charter schools denied authorization or renewal by their local school districts to seek approval from county boards of education or the State Board of Education. Instead, local school districts would have the first and last word on charter school petitions and renewals.