Advertisement
1297 posts
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
  • University of California
With no running water, children bathe at a fire hydrant in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
With no running water, children bathe at a fire hydrant in San Juan, Puerto Rico. (Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. First-generation students at UCLA now have a dormitory floor of their own.
  2. Cal State L.A.'s volleyball team rallied around its Puerto Rican members and coach, who  could not reach their families after Hurricane Maria hit the island.
  3. Parents got conflicting messages about a music teacher suspected of contaminating flutes with semen.

In California:

  1. A UC Riverside student allegedly grabbed another student's Make America Great Again hat from his head and verbally attacked him with profanity-filled accusations of promoting "genocide."
  2. A look at California schools' perpetual struggle to get between students and their phone screens.

Nationwide:

  1. Puerto Rico's schools have been closed since Hurricane Maria hit, and they are unlikely to open for several more weeks
  2. Congress let the Children's Health Insurance Program expire. It provides low-cost health insurance to 9 million children.
Advertisement
  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Katie Falkenberg / Los Angeles Times)

Desiree Felix didn’t make her way to UCLA with the help of helicopter parents who hired tutors, hounded teachers or edited her application essays.

Her father is a handyman with a sixth-grade education. Her mother finished high school and helps manage apartments.

In her freshman year, Felix has chosen to live on a newly created dorm floor just for students like her who are the first in their families to attend college.

Advertisement
  • Higher Education
  • California State University
(Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times)

Puerto Rican roots run deep on this team. Head coach Juan Figueroa and three of his players are from the island and have family on the U.S. territory.

After Hurricane Maria swept through Puerto Rico last month, leaving a trail of devastation, Figueroa and the three freshman players had a difficult time reaching family for days.

(Saugus Union School District)

Two Southern California school districts were giving conflicting messages over the weekend as they attempted to guide parents through a scare touched off last week by a state and federal investigation of a music specialist suspected of contaminating musical instruments with semen.

Responding to the probe, the Saugus Union School District in Los Angeles County sought help from parents to collect evidence in the investigation, which it said “is focusing on workshops where students made ‘flutes’ out of PVC pipe with a specific individual.”

  • Higher Education
  • University of California

A UC Riverside student asked campus police Friday to arrest a fellow Highlander who allegedly grabbed his Make America Great Again hat from his head and verbally attacked him with profanity-filled accusations of promoting "genocide."

A video of the young woman's actions against Matthew Vitale, a senior majoring in economics, drew heavy coverage by conservative media outlets that painted it as another assault on the free speech rights of right-leaning college students. The video was first posted Thursday by Campus Reform, a conservative news site.

Many conservative students say efforts to silence them have escalated since President Trump's election last year. Massive protests shut down campus talks by right-wing firebrand Milo Yiannopoulos at UC Davis and UC Berkeley this year and led to unprecedented security costs for other speakers, such as conservative writer Ben Shapiro.

Advertisement
(Jessica Zhou / HS Insider)

HS Insider college intern Jessica Zhou reported on the groundbreaking this summer at Little Tokyo Service Center's Budokan.

On a muggy Thursday in August, Little Tokyo Service Center broke ground for Budokan, its project to provide a recreational, cultural and community center for residents of Little Tokyo and Japanese Americans throughout Southern California.

More than just a basketball court

  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • California State University
  • LAUSD
Advocates are promoting awareness of trauma during a child's first years.
Advocates are promoting awareness of trauma during a child's first years. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. A new law lets schools send food waste to food banks. The idea came from leaders of Los Angeles Unified, where students toss out $100,000 in food a day.
  2. Cal State Dominguez Hills President Willie Hagan will retire at the end of the academic year.

In California:

  1. Over 100 agencies and advocacy groups in California are promoting awareness and legislation to reduce early childhood trauma.
  2. Teachers and administrators statewide say President Trump's immigration crackdown has scared students and made a focus on their wellness all the more important.

Nationwide:

  1. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos spoke at Harvard on Thursday. Her newest school choice analogy compares schools to food trucks. (An earlier version used Uber.)
  2. Some colleges are installing vending machines where students can buy the morning-after pill.
(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

So much school food goes wasted, tossed in the trash, uneaten. Each day in the Los Angeles Unified School District, students throw out at least $100,000 worth.

That works out to about 600 tons of organic waste daily, according to a 2015 study.

The district pushed for a new law to help change that — and this week Gov. Jerry Brown signed it. The law allows campuses to collect unopened items and untouched fruit and donate them to food banks.

Advertisement
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • LAUSD
(Thomas Grauman/Occidental College)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. Occidental College announced a new scholarship named after Barack Obama.
  2. Monica Garcia is the new president of the L.A. Unified school board.

In California:

  1. State test scores have been released after a month of delay. They're flat, but the lowest performing schools improved at a faster clip than state schools as a whole.
  2. The Times identifies the lowest performing schools and takes a closer look.

Nationwide:

  1. A North Carolina substitute teacher is out after telling a student to "go back to where you speak Spanish."
  2. Atty. Gen. Jeff Sessions stepped into the debate about free speech on college campuses.
(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

The new scores, released Wednesday, pave the way for state education officials to accomplish a key task: to identify — and then intervene to improve — the most underperforming schools.

The Every Student Succeeds Act, a federal law, requires states to identify the bottom 5% of their schools that serve low-income students and then take steps to turn them around. California can expect to get $2.6 billion from the federal government for complying with the law, mostly to help children from low-income families.

But the state doesn’t yet have a detailed plan for defining the lowest performers.