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  • Higher Education
  • California State University
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As hundreds of thousands of young immigrants protected under an Obama-era program anxiously await President Trump’s decision on whether to end it — which some reports say could come as early as Friday — schools and universities across California have launched rapid response teams, stepped up legal support, issued messages of solidarity and called on Trump to allow students who are in the country without legal status to continue their educations without fear of deportation.

At the Los Rios Community College District, which includes Sacramento City College, campus officials said they have convened a rapid response team in preparation for any changes to the federal program, known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA.

“By working together, we can and will continue to ensure that our colleges are safe places for ALL students to pursue their dreams," District Chancellor Brian King wrote in an email to the community. “Just like our efforts on emergency response preparedness, we may not know how and when a crisis will present itself for our students, but we have a responsibility to be ready for all potential scenarios.”

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(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

The call they had been waiting for came just before the sun set on a blazing day.

Romulo Avelica-Gonzalez told his wife, Norma, that he was finally getting out of the immigration detention facility.

“Your dad is out!” she told her four daughters.

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(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

During his nearly five years heading the tiny Centinela Valley Union High School District, prosecutors say, Jose A. Fernandez devised policies to dramatically pad his salary and retirement benefits.

In 2013 alone, supervising a handful of schools in Hawthorne and Lawndale, the former superintendent pocketed $663,000 in pay and benefits. He kept the school board in the dark, prosecutors say, covering his actions with lies and misrepresentations.

Now, Fernandez, 57, is facing a dozen public corruption charges and up to 15 years in state prison. Records show he was arrested Wednesday morning and booked into Los Angeles County jail.

  • K-12
(Marcus Yam / Los Angeles Times)

Romulo Avelica-Gonzalez, an immigrant in the country illegally who caused a furor when his arrest while taking his daughters to school was caught on video, is expected to be released Wednesday night after a judge announced that he is eligible to post a $6,000 bond.

The 10 a.m. bond hearing at the Adelanto Detention Facility in San Bernardino County was tense, with his four daughters sitting in a row on a bench as the judge questioned Avelica-Gonzalez about his family, his years in the U.S. and his criminal history. They sat wide-eyed, on the brink of tears.

  • Higher Education
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San Diego State University professor J. Luke Wood, left, will teach a new doctoral class called Black Minds Matter.
San Diego State University professor J. Luke Wood, left, will teach a new doctoral class called Black Minds Matter. (Gary Warth / San Diego Union-Tribune)

In and around Los Angeles:

  1. New research finds that about 1 in 4 L.A. Unified graduates are earning college degrees.
  2. An L.A. Unified after-school coach was sentenced to 105 years to life in prison for molesting students.
  3. San Diego State University is offering a doctoral class called Black Minds Matter, prompting some conservative protest.

Statewide:

  1. State test scores are delayed because of a mix-up with some special education students' scores.
  2. Research suggests that starting school later each day could be an economic boon worth billions for the state.

Nationwide:

  1. The state of Maryland has hired an outside firm to investigate accusations of tampering to raise Prince George's County's graduation rates.
  2. People in China want American teachers to help their kids learn English.
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(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

A study released Wednesday put an exclamation point on something that Los Angeles Unified School District officials already have acknowledged: Too few of their graduates — about 1 in 4 — are earning a college degree.

The latest data points from two studies, by UCLA and Claremont Graduate University researchers, were no surprise to L.A. Unified. District officials had early access to the research — in fact, they were partners to the effort, long before this week’s formal release.

A coach for a Los Angeles Unified School District after-school program was sentenced to 105 years to life in prison Tuesday for molesting multiple students over several years.

Ronnie Lee Roman, 44, of San Fernando, worked as a Youth Services coach for Beyond the Bell, an after-school program offered in some elementary and middle schools. He was convicted June 7 of seven counts of lewd acts on a child and a special allegation of having multiple victims.

(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

California's data-related delay in the release of its state standardized test scores is due to a mix-up in some special education students' scores, an official said Tuesday.

The results of the California Assessment of Student Performance and Progress were initially scheduled to be released Tuesday.

Late last Friday, the California Department of Education said the results would be delayed indefinitely due to a data issue. The obvious question was, what sort of data issue?

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(Los Angeles Times)

The concept sounds simple: Take a good school, figure out what’s happening to make students successful, and re-create those elements to spread the success somewhere else.

Replication, as this process is called, has become a buzzword with charter schools nationwide as they expand their networks on the promise of bringing high achievement at existing schools to new ones.

Could the idea work for public schools? The Los Angeles Unified School District has a chance to find out.

  • Higher Education
  • University of California

UC Berkeley’s chief counsel was killed Sunday in a hit-and-run crash while bicycling in Sonoma County, authorities said.

Christopher Patti was struck and killed by a driver in a BMW who lost control as he entered a curve on California 116 in Guerneville, according to the California Highway Patrol.