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1293 posts
  • Higher Education
USC Norman Topping Student Aid Fund director Christina Yokoyama, center, and students Sabrina Enriquez, David Delgado and Jayjay Jiang.
USC Norman Topping Student Aid Fund director Christina Yokoyama, center, and students Sabrina Enriquez, David Delgado and Jayjay Jiang. (Gary Coronado/Los Angeles Times)

For decades, students at USC have been charging themselves a small fee each semester to support classmates who come from low-income households or are the first in their families to attend college.

The Norman Topping Student Aid Fund was launched in the 1970s by two undergraduates who wanted to help diversify their too-white, too-privileged campus.

From the start, the fund has been administered largely by fellow students. Over the years, it has supported over $10 million in scholarships, fostered a close-knit community of scholars and garnered national attention for the ways in which its programs help underrepresented students navigate the emotions, logistics and academics of the college experience.

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  • Betsy DeVos
  • Higher Education
  • K-12
  • University of California
  • LAUSD
(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

In and around Los Angeles:

Students and alumni are protesting USC administrators’ decision to take over control of a fund — paid for and largely managed by students — that gives extra support to classmates who are first-generation immigrants or come from low-income families.

L.A. Unified Board member Kelly Gonez told HuffPost that she is determined to fight President Trump’s policies proactively.

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They circulated petitions, shared their stories of hardship and pressed the University of California regents to delay a controversial vote to raise their tuition and fees.

University of California regents decided Wednesday afternoon to put off a controversial vote on raising tuition and fees.

  • K-12
  • HS Insider
University of Iowa
University of Iowa (Vladimir Kulikov / Wikimedia Commons)

Jenna Wang, a sophomore at Iowa City West High School, talks to students and a counselor at her school about the stress of the college application process and the tendency toward perfectionism.

As an increasing number of high school students apply to college each year, just as many diverse perspectives form about college. Iowa City West High School’s student publication West Side Story examined some of these perspectives to redefine what a “dream school” really means.

Throughout her career as a high school counselor, Kelly Bergmann has noticed a growing trend of perfectionism among high-achieving students toward college applications and the consequences and myths that come along with it.

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
Gov. Jerry Brown
Gov. Jerry Brown (Rich Pedroncelli / Associated Press)

Gov. Jerry Brown just racheted up political tensions over a potential increase in tuition and fees for University of California students.

In a letter delivered to UC regents Wednesday afternoon, Brown urged them to “reject outright” the proposed 2.7% increase. He said he has increased funding to the 10-campus UC system by $1.2 billion since 2012 and that raising student costs now would be premature amid economic uncertainty. 

“Economic expansions do not last forever and the future is uncertain,” he wrote. “More work is needed now to reduce the university’s costs to insure that students and families have access to an affordable, quality education. 

The Santa Clara County judge who sentenced a former Stanford University swimmer to six months in jail for sexually assaulting a woman after a fraternity will be up for a recall vote later this year, the Registrar of Voters announced on Tuesday.

  • Higher Education
  • University of California
(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

University of California students urged regents Wednesday to reject a proposed tuition increase, saying it would hurt those already struggling to afford the high costs of housing, textbooks and food. 

Regents meeting at UC San Francisco are scheduled to vote later in the day on the proposal to increase tuition and student services fees for state students by 2.7%. That would be an extra $342 for state students, which would bring their total bill to $12,972 for the coming academic year. Non-resident students would pay an additional $978 in supplemental tuition, and $28,992 overall.

UC officials say increased financial aid would cover the higher costs for more than half of UC’s 180,000 California undergraduates. 

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  • Higher Education
  • University of California
UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ
UC Berkeley Chancellor Carol Christ (David Butow / For The Times)

Overcrowded classrooms. Unmet demand for courses. Less money for faculty and graduate student fellowships. Failing elevators and exhaust systems. 

Those problems plague UC Berkeley, the nation’s top public research university, and stand to get worse without a tuition increase, Chancellor Carol Christ says.

Christ lays out the case for a tuition increase in prepared remarks set for delivery Wednesday afternoon at the UC regents meeting in San Francisco. The regents are set to vote on a proposal to raise tuition and student services fees by $342 for state students and an additional $978 for nonresident students for the coming academic year. 

University of California regents face a showdown with Gov. Jerry Brown as they prepare to vote Wednesday on a plan to raise tuition and student services fees for the next academic year.